Imperial Chinese Court Regency

Advocacy via Regency for Constitutional Monarchy in China

Archive for the month “June, 2012”

Update : South Sea Provinces – Sansha City, Yongxing Island, South Sea Provinces – 08:23, June 20, 2012

China dissatisfied over Vietnam’s island patrols: spokesman (People’s Daily Online) 08:23, June 20, 2012
A spokesman for China’s Foreign Ministry at a regular press briefing on June 19 (File photo/ Foreign Ministry of China)

A developed Sansha City on Yongxing Island envisioned.

BEIJING, June 20 (People’s Daily Online) — A spokesman for China’s Foreign Ministry on Tuesday expressed strong dissatisfaction over Vietnamese fighters’ recent patrolling and reconnaissance on Nansha Islands in the South China Sea.

Speaking at a regular press briefing in response to a journalist’s question on the subject, Hong Lei said, “China has indisputable sovereignty over the Nansha Islands and their adjacent waters. Vietnam’s recent action is a serious violation of China’s sovereignty.”

He said China urges Vietnam to strictly abide by the Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea, avoid actions escalating or complicating the situation, and make efforts to safeguard regional peace and stability.

ICCR Notes :

A 30% flat ‘sequestered asset requisition fund’ which applied against Chinese citizen billionaires (who cannot refuse capitalist style), could easily raise up to 300 billion to build a high tech Naval Fortress and sea colony at the Nansha Archipelago to end all arguments once and for all. What would Mao have required in earlier times but total defence of China’s territories?

China’s biggest, least populated city of Xisha born in disputed waters – June 22, 9:03 pm | By Xu Weiwei

China has raised the administrative status of Xisha, Zhongsha and Nansha islands from county to prefectural level in disputed waters, the latest escalation in tensions over the resource-rich South China Sea, according to an official statement released on Thursday following a Vietnamese law asserting sovereignty over the islands.

The statement from the Ministry of Civil Affairs said the State Council has approved to set up the prefectural-level city of Sansha to administer the three island groups and their surrounding waters. It said the government seat will be stationed on Yongxing Island, part of the Xisha Islands.

The county-level administration complex for the islands, was established on Yongxing in 1959, and will be built up to a prefectural level, the statement said.

The new-born city is China’s biggest by size and least populated, with 13 square kilometers of islands area and over 200 square kilometers of waters where around 3,500 Chinese citizes live permanently and 25,000 a floating population, according to the Legal Evening News. A spokesperson for the Ministry of Civil Affairs told the official Xinhua News Agency on Thursday that setting up Sansha city will help to improve China’s “administrative management on Xisha, Zhongsha and Nansha islands and their future development”.

“It is also conducive to protecting the oceanic environment of the South China Sea,” the spokesperson was quoted as saying. China first discovered and named the reefs, islets and surrounding waters of Xisha, Zhongsha and Nansha islands, and has long had sovereignty over the area, the spokesperson said.

China has conflicting claims with the Philippines, Vietnam, Brunei, Malaysia and Taiwan across the South China Sea, key shipping lanes thought to contain rich energy reserves. Vietnam and the Philippines have been the most vocal opponents of China’s claims.

Xu Liping, an expert on Southeast Asia issues at Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said the move shows China’s latest measure to assert sovereignty over the area, and is also a response to the Philippines and Vietnam’s asserting sovereignty over the islands. Vietnam’s new Maritime Law declaring sovereignty and jurisdiction drew such a huge outcry from the locals that Beijing decided to formalise a prefecture. Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Zhang Zhijun summoned Vietnamese Ambassador Nguyen Van Tho clarified “serious violations” and called for an “immediate corrections” amidst the celebrations among the locals, Reuters reported.

Excerpt from Global Times’ : A Positivist View by reporter Wang Zhaokun

A good choice to consolidate sovereignty in accordance with local conditions is to organize fishermen to establish some fishing companies, which can help protect Chinese fishing resources. This can also bring benefits to local fishermen.

Another possible choice is to establish several economic development zones in the area. We can invite foreign companies to cooperate with their Chinese counterparts to invest and develop resources in the South China Sea. This can demonstrate China’s sincerity in putting aside disputes and seeking common development.

The South China Sea is known as one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes. We might also considering establishing supply bases there to offer supply and maintenance to passing merchant ships and fishing vessels.

The article was compiled by Global Times reporter Wang Zhaokun based on an interview with Zhuang Guotu, director of the Center for Southeast Asia Studies at Xiamen University.

http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/717003.shtml

China tightening grip on Spratlys by Pia Lee-Brago (The Philippine Star) Updated June 23, 2012 12:00 AM

MANILA, Philippines – China has set up a new “prefecture level” city called Sansha to administer three disputed islands in the West Philippine Sea (South China Sea), according to Chinese state-owned Xinhua news agency.

The development has tightened China’s grip on islands that it calls its own in the West Philippine Sea, particularly the Spratlys.

On Thursday, Xinhua reported that Xisha (Paracels), Zhongsha (Macclesfield bank), and Nansha (Spratlys) islands have been collectively elevated to prefecture status under Sansha city from their previous county-level status.

Sansha means “city of three sands” in Chinese.

A statement from the Ministry of Civil Affairs said the State Council or China’s Cabinet has approved the establishment of Sansha, with its seat of government on Yongxing Island, which is part of the Paracels.

The county-level “administration office” for the three islands was also based on Yongxing Island.

A spokesperson for China’s Ministry of Civil Affairs said the creation of Sansha city would help improve China’s “administrative management on Xisha, Zhongsha and Nansha islands and their future development.”

“It is also conducive to protecting the oceanic environment of the South China Sea,” the spokesman said.

He claimed that China set up the administration office for the three islands in 1959.

He also maintained that it was China which first discovered and named the reefs and islets around Xisha, Zhongsha and Nansha Islands.

The Department of Foreign Affairs said it had no detailed information on China’s latest declaration.

“We don’t have yet the details of this report,” DFA spokesman Raul Hernandez said.

Also on Thursday, China’s foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei urged Philippine officials to refrain from making remarks meant to influence public opinion on the month-old standoff at Panatag (Scarborough) Shoal.

Hong issued the statement at a press briefing in Beijing when asked to comment on President Aquino’s announcement that Philippine Air Force planes would fly over Panatag Shoal to check on the situation in the area.

Hong asserted it was the Philippine warships’ “harassment” of Chinese fishermen in early April that triggered the Panatag Shoal incident.

He said the Philippines’ tough and high profile stance on the issue had only heightened tensions.

But he said tensions have eased and that the two sides have been vigorously exerting efforts to repair bilateral relations.

“China hopes the Philippine side will do more to help the development of bilateral ties and refrain from stirring public opinion, so as to safeguard the recovery of bilateral ties,” Hong said.

The DFA also said the Philippines greatly appreciates the United States’ reaffirming of its support for the country in its territorial dispute with China, as relayed by Ambassador Harry Thomas Jr.

“What US Ambassador Harry Thomas Jr. said on Thursday was a reiteration of the US position on the territorial dispute and support for the Philippines to seek resolution,” Hernandez said.

The US has been pressing China, the Philippines and other countries with territorial claims in the West Philippine Sea to resolve their dispute through diplomacy, particularly in accordance with international law, including the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). At the 2+2 meeting in May in Washington, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had expressed deep concern over developments in the West Philippine Sea and urged China to clarify its motivation and interest in the region. Hernandez said that Clinton’s message was for nations involved to “subscribe to a rules-based approach in resolving competing claims in maritime areas through peaceful, collaborative, multilateral and diplomatic processes within the framework of international law, reflected in the UNCLOS.”

“This is the same position that the Philippines has repeatedly conveyed to China,” Hernandez said.

Unmindful of China

As China appears to be tightening its grip on territories being claimed by its smaller neighbors, the mayor of Kalayaan town in the Spratlys said he and his constituents would never give up asserting Philippines sovereignty. Mayor Eugenio Bito-onon, in a telephone interview, said that while China cannot be prevented from doing “crazy things,” they would never recognize its latest effort to strengthen its “administrative control” over the Spratlys.

“We do not recognize that. We are a regime of islands under the Philippine government,” Bito-onon, said, stressing that Kalayaaan town has been in existence for 34 years. He said his municipality celebrated its founding anniversary last June 11.

He also said the seat of the so-called Sansha city on Yongxing Island or Woody Island in the Paracels – a Chinese island garrison – is 364 nautical miles from Kalayaan island town.

“It’s very far from Pag-Asa. It’s not going to affect us,” he said.

Aside from China and the Philippines, Vietnam, Taiwan, Brunei and Malaysia have territorial claims in the area.

All Spratlys claimant countries have troops in the region except for Brunei. Jaime Laude

ICCR Notes :

Do not be hasty in choosing sides Mayor Eugenio Bito-onon. All citizens of of the autonomous village of Kalayaan will be given appropriate UN compliant options to be part of China’s prosperity or be accorded permanent resident rights with all existing ownerships and properties recognized. Do not be so quick to assert for forces that will make no difference in your lives Kalayaans!

Make the right decision and like Puerto Rico (also the offer under consideration for extention to President Benigno by the Lord Protector which is being mulled . . . ) choose the better of 2 nations in an openly conducted referendum between Mayor Eugenio and the CPCC official with any attendant mandarin overseeing discussions. The people of Kalayaan must choose the best future, instead of decades of stagnation under corrupted and fractionated governments (think the Ampatuan Massacre led by you-know-who, which could never happen under autonomous status with China’s protection), and who knows, instead of unecessary strife and war, be part of a massive tourism centre piece and luxury tourism industry building up around the bad decision makers. It willl be a glorious day for all new and old Chinese citizens, do not miss the opportunity!

As for naysayers, Do not play ‘Gaza’ with China. Look at your Ming maps for any legality to save face by not attack face with. China is NOT Israel taking decades to quell territories that UN has earlier confirmed boundaries of. Kelayaans have And those Chinese settlers and cities like Kalayaan who should submit referendums to UN for joining China, will be well backed by forces worth far more than a peaceful cooperation and withdrawal of claim than any escalation could achieve. China doubtful though will claim more to ‘keep face’ at the UN. There will be zero tolerance for any military action against peaceful settlers who have legally bought land titles or drilling rights, though China will always be open to normalisation after recognition and withdrawal of offending statements for ‘peace’.

Being on the morally wrong side is something China will not do, but ancient claims are valid where they stand.  And dont bother about oil, there is nothing fossil fuels will be worth in a short while. Fusion or other green energies are already present. Welcome to the Chinese Millenium, it is as if the Ming Dynasty continued after 700 years – that is the extent of the issue. China is finally setting up a beautiful new city in the long neglected Southern Sea Provinces. Long live the Imperium.

China dissatisfied over Vietnam’s island patrols: spokesman (People’s Daily Online) 08:23, June 20, 2012

A spokesman for China’s Foreign Ministry at a regular press briefing on June 19 (File photo/ Foreign Ministry of China)

BEIJING, June 20 (People’s Daily Online) — A spokesman for China’s Foreign Ministry on Tuesday expressed strong dissatisfaction over Vietnamese fighters’ recent patrolling and reconnaissance on Nansha Islands in the South China Sea.

Speaking at a regular press briefing in response to a journalist’s question on the subject, Hong Lei said, “China has indisputable sovereignty over the Nansha Islands and their adjacent waters. Vietnam’s recent action is a serious violation of China’s sovereignty.”

He said China urges Vietnam to strictly abide by the Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea, avoid actions escalating or complicating the situation, and make efforts to safeguard regional peace and stability.

ICCR Notes :

The 30% flat ‘sequestered asset requisition fund’ which applied against Chinese citizen billionaires (who cannot refuse capitalist style), could easily raise up to 300 billion to build a high tech Naval Fortress and sea colony at the Nansha Archipelago to end all arguments once and for all. What would Mao have required in earlier times but total defence of China’s territories?

China’s biggest, least populated city of Xisha born in disputed waters – June 22, 9:03 pm | By Xu Weiwei

China has raised the administrative status of Xisha, Zhongsha and Nansha islands from county to prefectural level in disputed waters, the latest escalation in tensions over the resource-rich South China Sea, according to an official statement released on Thursday following a Vietnamese law asserting sovereignty over the islands.

The statement from the Ministry of Civil Affairs said the State Council has approved to set up the prefectural-level city of Sansha to administer the three island groups and their surrounding waters. It said the government seat will be stationed on Yongxing Island, part of the Xisha Islands.

The county-level administration complex for the islands, was established on Yongxing in 1959, and will be built up to a prefectural level, the statement said.

The new-born city is China’s biggest by size and least populated, with 13 square kilometers of islands area and over 200 square kilometers of waters where around 3,500 Chinese citizes live permanently and 25,000 a floating population, according to the Legal

Evening News. A spokesperson for the Ministry of Civil Affairs told the official Xinhua News Agency on Thursday that setting up Sansha city will help to improve China’s “administrative management on Xisha, Zhongsha and Nansha islands and their future development”.

“It is also conducive to protecting the oceanic environment of the South China Sea,” the spokesperson was quoted as saying. China first discovered and named the reefs, islets and surrounding waters of Xisha, Zhongsha and Nansha islands, and has long had sovereignty over the area, the spokesperson said.

China has conflicting claims with the Philippines, Vietnam, Brunei, Malaysia and Taiwan across the South China Sea, key shipping lanes thought to contain rich energy reserves. Vietnam and the Philippines have been the most vocal opponents of China’s claims.

Xu Liping, an expert on Southeast Asia issues at Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said the move shows China’s latest measure to assert sovereignty over the area, and is also a response to the Philippines and Vietnam’s asserting sovereignty over the islands. Vietnam’s new Maritime Law declaring sovereignty and jurisdiction drew such a huge outcry from the locals that Beijing decided to formalise a prefecture. Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Zhang Zhijun summoned Vietnamese Ambassador Nguyen Van

Tho clarified “serious violations” and called for an “immediate corrections” amidst the celebrations among the locals, Reuters reported.

China tightening grip on Spratlys by Pia Lee-Brago (The Philippine Star) Updated June 23, 2012 12:00 AM Comments (20) View comments

MANILA, Philippines – China has set up a new “prefecture level” city called Sansha to administer three disputed islands in the West Philippine Sea (South China Sea), according to Chinese state-owned Xinhua news agency.

The development has tightened China’s grip on islands that it calls its own in the West Philippine Sea, particularly the Spratlys.

On Thursday, Xinhua reported that Xisha (Paracels), Zhongsha (Macclesfield bank), and Nansha (Spratlys) islands have been collectively elevated to prefecture status under Sansha city from their previous county-level status.

Sansha means “city of three sands” in Chinese.

A statement from the Ministry of Civil Affairs said the State Council or China’s Cabinet has approved the establishment of Sansha, with its seat of government on Yongxing Island, which is part of the Paracels.

The county-level “administration office” for the three islands was also based on Yongxing Island.

A spokesperson for China’s Ministry of Civil Affairs said the creation of Sansha city would help improve China’s “administrative management on Xisha, Zhongsha and Nansha islands and their future development.”

“It is also conducive to protecting the oceanic environment of the South China Sea,” the spokesman said.

He claimed that China set up the administration office for the three islands in 1959.

He also maintained that it was China which first discovered and named the reefs and islets around Xisha, Zhongsha and Nansha Islands.

The Department of Foreign Affairs said it had no detailed information on China’s latest declaration.

“We don’t have yet the details of this report,” DFA spokesman Raul Hernandez said.

Also on Thursday, China’s foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei urged Philippine officials to refrain from making remarks meant to influence public opinion on the month-old standoff at Panatag (Scarborough) Shoal.

Hong issued the statement at a press briefing in Beijing when asked to comment on President Aquino’s announcement that Philippine Air Force planes would fly over Panatag Shoal to check on the situation in the area.

Hong asserted it was the Philippine warships’ “harassment” of Chinese fishermen in early April that triggered the Panatag Shoal incident.

He said the Philippines’ tough and high profile stance on the issue had only heightened tensions.

But he said tensions have eased and that the two sides have been vigorously exerting efforts to repair bilateral relations.

“China hopes the Philippine side will do more to help the development of bilateral ties and refrain from stirring public opinion, so as to safeguard the recovery of bilateral ties,” Hong said.

The DFA also said the Philippines greatly appreciates the United States’ reaffirming of its support for the country in its territorial dispute with China, as relayed by Ambassador Harry Thomas Jr.

“What US Ambassador Harry Thomas Jr. said on Thursday was a reiteration of the US position on the territorial dispute and support for the Philippines to seek resolution,” Hernandez said.

The US has been pressing China, the Philippines and other countries with territorial claims in the West Philippine Sea to resolve their dispute through diplomacy, particularly in accordance with international law, including the United Nations Convention on the

Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). At the 2+2 meeting in May in Washington, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had expressed deep concern over developments in the West Philippine Sea and urged China to clarify its motivation and interest in the region. Hernandez said that Clinton’s message was for nations involved to “subscribe to a rules-based approach in resolving competing claims in maritime areas through peaceful, collaborative, multilateral and diplomatic processes within the framework of international law, reflected in the UNCLOS.”

“This is the same position that the Philippines has repeatedly conveyed to China,” Hernandez said.

Unmindful of China

As China appears to be tightening its grip on territories being claimed by its smaller neighbors, the mayor of Kalayaan town in the Spratlys said he and his constituents would never give up asserting Philippines sovereignty. Mayor Eugenio Bito-onon, in a telephone interview, said that while China cannot be prevented from doing “crazy things,” they would never recognize its latest effort to strengthen its “administrative control” over the Spratlys.

“We do not recognize that. We are a regime of islands under the Philippine government,” Bito-onon, said, stressing that Kalayaaan town has been in existence for 34 years. He said his municipality celebrated its founding anniversary last June 11.

He also said the seat of the so-called Sansha city on Yongxing Island or Woody Island in the Paracels – a Chinese island garrison – is 364 nautical miles from Kalayaan island town. “It’s very far from Pag-Asa. It’s not going to affect us,” he said.

Aside from China and the Philippines, Vietnam, Taiwan, Brunei and Malaysia have territorial claims in the area. All Spratlys claimant countries have troops in the region except for Brunei. Jaime Laude

ICCR Notes :

Do not play ‘Gaza’ with China. There will be zero tolerance for any military action against peaceful settlers who have legally bought land titles or drilling rights, though China will always be open to normalisation after recognition and withdrawal of statements for ‘peace’. All citizens of of the autonomous village of Kalayaan will be given appropriate UN compliant options to be part of China’s prosperity or be accorded permananent resident rights with all existing ownerships and properties recognized. Do not be so quick to assert for forces that will make no difference in your lives Kalayaans!

Make the right decision and like Puerto Rico (also the offer under consideration for extention to President Benigno by the Lord Protector which is being mulled . . . ) choose the better of 2 nations in an openly conducted referendum between Mayor Eugenio and the CPCC official with any attendant mandarin overseeing discussions. The people of Kalayaan must choose the best future, instead of decades of stagnation under corrupted and fractionated governments (think the Ampatuan Massacre – which could never happen under autonomous status with China’s protection), and who knows, instead of unecessary strife and war, be part of a massive tourism centre piece and luxury tourism industry building up around the bad decision makers. It willl be glorious day for all new and old Chinese citizens, do not miss the opportunity!

As for naysayers, look at your Ming maps for any legality to save face by not attack face with. China is NOT Israel taking decades to quell territories that UN has earlier confirned boundaries of. Kelayaans have And those Chinese settlers and cities like Kalayaan who should submit referendums to UN for joining China, will be well backed by forces wort far more than a peaceful cooperation and withdrawal of claim than any escalation could achieve. China doubtful though will claim more to ‘keep face’ at the UN. Being on the morally wrong side is something China will not do, but ancient claims are valid where they stand.  And dont bother about oil, there is nothing fossil fuels will be worth in a short while. Fusion or other green energies are already present. Welcome to the Chinese Millenium, as if the Ming Dynasty continued after 700 years that is the extent of the issue.

Great Oceanic Wall of China

Vietnam’s Central Localities Oppose China’s Sansha City Plan – June 25, 2012 13:29 PM

HANOI, June 25 (Bernama) — Leaders of Da Nang city and Khanh Hoa province have voiced their objection to China’s decision to establish the so-called Sansha city that administratively covers the Vietnamese island districts of Hoang Sa and Truong Sa.

Nguyen Chien Thang, chairman of the Khanh Hoa Provincial People’s Committee, said the island district of Truong Sa is an inseparable part of the Vietnamese territory and is under the administrative management of the central province of Khanh Hoa.

The Khanh Hoa administration and people are unhappy over China’s decision which they said seriously violates Vietnam’s sovereignty and has no legal value, Vietnam News Agency quoted Nguyen as saying.

“We strongly oppose and demand that China quash its wrongful and illegal decision, and do not take further action detrimental to bilateral ties and friendship between the two countries,” said Thang.

Chairman of the Da Nang Municipal People’s Committee Van Huu Chien said Hoang Sa’s island district is part of the country’s territory which comes under Da Nang city’s administration.

Van strongly opposed the Chinese plan and requested China to rescind it.

— BERNAMA

ICCR Notes :

As said. Welcome to the Chinese Millenium, as if the Ming Dynasty continued after 700 years – that is the extent of the issue.

Vietnam should think longer term and in historical context. Dropping these claims on what was already agreed upon since the Ming Dynasty (Vietnam incidentally,  recognized China’s ownership of Sansha all the way up to WW2 . . . ) could be the best thing in the long run. After all who knows if USA is still smarting from the last war USA lost, and teams up with China on this one if anything does happen? Just a few islands and as detailed in the rebuttal of an earlier article, up to 1911 or even after WW2, Vietnam has known that China has been controlling the islands.

This is unwritten Asian politeness. And Vietnam should not change stance on this as an Far East Asian gentleman, especially AFTER China has invested so much in Vietnam lately. 600+ years of assent that the islands belong to China, then after WW2, this sudden turn around emboldened by a UN Sea Laws by UN which also backed USA’s attempt at colonization after WW2? Some consistency and sense of fairplay please Vietnam?

Please reconsider withdrawing all offending statements and policies on China’s sovereign territory Vietnam. History and the logistical odds are not on Vietnam’s page here. UN was formed in 1949, then the USA tried to colonize Vietnam AFTER French incursion  of the last century. These territorial claims and recognition go back to as far as Vietnam’s first established dynasty. Polite deference on a long claimed territory is in order and China is in many ways not being unfair about the claims. Vietnam of course will be like all other nations, especially in ASEAN, welcome to invest in Sansha.

All claimant houses in ICCR and the Council of Regency strongly oppose the Vietnam plan and request Vietnam to rescind all recent actions on China’s South Sea Dominions.

Advertisements

A Tentative Essay on Re-Developments in ‘Deeper/Hidden’ Chinese Culture : Bearing of Genteel Arms (A Primer) – posted by T.E. Yu on behalf of Pater H – 12th June 2012

Incorporating the Article from : Six arts of ancient China (chinaculture.org) Updated: 2010-01-06 17:16

The Six Arts have their roots in Confucian philosophy. To master the Six Arts is the equivalent of the obtaining the status of a Renaissance Man. The elements of ethical education, academic study, physical education and etiquette are present in the Six Arts – all attributes requisite for Courtiers in a resurgent Imperial Chinese Court.

“To educate somebody, you should start from poems, emphasize ceremonies and finish with music.” A famous saying of Confucius on education.

As early as the Shang Dynasty (circa 16th century – 11 century BC) and Zhou Dynasty (circa 11th century – 256 BC), archery was a required skill for all aristocratic men (who would lead in battle). By practicing archery and related etiquettes, nobles not only gained the proficiency at war skills; more importantly, they also cultivated their minds and learned how to behave as nobles. To become a charioteer is also an excellent form of training that requires the combined use of intellect and physical strength. To promote all-around development in peaceful times later, students were required to master calligraphy, mathematics, rites, music, and the earlier mentioned archery and chariot racing.

This series of six practical disciplines became the Six Arts (六艺 liù yì):

Writing, or calligraphy, tempers a student’s aggressiveness and arrogance, while arithmetic strengthens one’s mental agility. The study of rites and music instills in people a sense of dignity and harmony. The rites include sacrificial ceremonies, funerals and military activities. Abit further though we enter the deeper levels of Chinese culture, philosophy, occultism and alchemy.

HISTORICAL CONTEXT

During the period of Cultural revolution these schools and masters were greatly feared by the early less cultivated military Junta, and perhaps with a more open attitude and proof of the lower classes of their right to access these skills (though wrongfully and violently), the next generation of former junta who have not been involved or are inclined to pogroms and expulsions as seen in the past or become as useless materialist Capitalist plutocrats with no consideration for the people around them, China cannot do without the schools of mysticism which have fled to Taiwan, but Taiwan without the mainland is as a body without a spirit. Together the soul of the Chinese peoples could yet bring about a much needed rennaissance of culture the likes that the world has never seen before. All Orthodox Tao schools have association and charter by the Dragon throne in re-formation to be ascended by an appropriate member of the Imperial House of Ying, Qin Dynasty as Ying III. ICCR’s temporary Emperor HIM Ying III’s message can be seen in the ‘about’ section.

After a proper stint at training of sword play, specifically with the civilian level ‘jian’ ? (the equivalent of the ‘Epee’ – with the single edged dao, the Sabre equivalent, carried by the military caste), the properly trained ‘Wushi’ and ‘Wenren’ (look up sections in this blog on the ‘Scholar Garden’) began work towards qualification for inclusion among the aristocratic ‘Jue Shi’ via the 6 Arts, and worked towards the grade of (the at least non-work oriented) ‘Xun Jue’ which required ability and sensitivity to acquire understanding in extreme nuance and required much study and a general departure from mainstream society of plutocrats and material matters to cultivate beauty, qi and the wonders of the Forbidden City towards betterment of the spiritual dimensions of the Imperium.

Flywhisk (left) and Jian Sword (right), Taoist martial (Wushi) arts.

Note 1 : In China, the 刀 ‘dao’ (do distinguish from the faith Taoism 道 ‘dao’ The Way, which is also spelt with a ‘d’ in hanyu pinyin) is known as one of the four major weapons, along with the gun (staff), qiang (spear), and the jian (sword), and referred to as “The General of All Weapons”.

GRADATIONS beyond the Wushi : The ‘nuanced language’ and ‘qi’ aspect is highly emphasised at this level

a) Dexterous Ornamental Fan Handling Skills (this is akin to an advanced form of ‘hand acrobatics’, or ‘sleight of fan’, an advanced take on a shorter form of the escrima)
b) The Blade Edged Metal Fan (this is a martial arts school with blade related variants from other martial arts using batons or rodform staves)
c) The Aery Fan (this is an occult arts school) andMahagony Sword rank equal
d) The Fly Whisk ranks above the former.

Orthodox Taoism

Significance of the Fly Whisk : these are not used or borne among the commoners or profane or even the outer orders who do deal with commoners. If there are no dedicated or state designated areas for use, typically the fly whisk can be seen in Taoistic Spirit Schools for ‘Occult Training’ or in Taiji parks and groves among the (well past material issues) elite.

Pre-requisite Training

i) Huangmei ‘Expression Scarf’    Private cultivation of Huangmei ‘Expression Scarf’ use is typically done in the mornings and evenings, begins once a child can walk.
ii) Study of Mudras – Study of Mudras is done as a form of supplication used to communicate with the ether, that begins once a child picks up the calligraphy brush.
iii) Whip Usage – Whip usage, once a child has necessary coordination.
iv) Large Calligraphy Brush (Feather Wand) – This is a stave sized brush that upon mastery of the skills of, entitles one to bear the Fly Whisk, a symbol of mastery of all these skills. The Feather Wand has Taoist significance over the Aery elements (including mastery of all incenses).

The Taoist Aery Feather Wand

;as a precursor, permit, and requisite qualification to use and bearing of the Fly Whisk. As the Fly Whisk is a tool or weapon of spirit, colour designation is a necessity (even if ascertained by the state registered Taoist Orders). In general (and a foray into re-development and a list of pitfalls against purist form, if not long established) we have :

White – Vegetarians, Purity
Grey – Either Vegetarians, Purity
Black – Non-Vegetarians, Non-Purity

Red – Has killed a being before, carnal knowledge, has given birth to another, those between worlds
Orange – Has embraced tenets of Buddhism incompatible with Orthodox Taoism
Yellow – Is a member of the royal family (draconic / naga realms)
Green – Has dalliances with the lower realms
Blue –  Has dalliances with the deathly realms
Violet – Night School

These all apply to the current life. A rainbow of colours displayed on the arms here does not mean better or more diverse persons, but the tendency is for the person to be a communicator (more rarely intermarriage between realms have also been known) between realms much as each strand is a link to the appropriate realms’ ‘denizen of necessity’ (i.e. diplomat or ‘dealer with the outsiders’ – again a mark of impurity . . . ).

THE FLY WHISK

White Horse Hair and Zitan Flywhisk, other materials appropriate to the sage or celestial in question are also known. Horn, or hair from certain animals may be substituted as needed.

The Fly Whisk is granted as an upper grade form of the literary and occult schools using the Mahogany Sword or occult art ‘Wind Fan’. ‘Wind Skill’ complements the Fan School (also is requisite), and can be very destructive in the hands of the uncultivated. The cultivated manifest these skills in the form of waterspouts or localized tornados, extreme droughts etc. at call. The extreme levels have access to telekinesis and levitation as witnessed by Pater H (cautionary on Earthquakes and Tidal Waves . . . ) .

The Taoist Wind Robe

This has roots in ‘Wind Spirit’ Animism, and cannot be accessed by those with no healthy respect of nature or the 5 elements or a ‘inner self’ that is known to and well loved by the Celestial Hierarchies.

After studies of the occult significance of the fly whisk and proper capacity for use, a Fly Whisk appropriate (those who hide behind the significance are again cursed, simply they find themselves unable to bear the fly whisk of the false colour without appearing like charlatans.

Identifying charlatans is simple, ask them of their willingness to be affiliated into a registered association and determine their demeanour among other spiritual individuals by bringing up issues on faith. A well studied faither would be well aware of some things and respond in a certain manner. This typically would put the peasants off but that is why stratification of society is unavoidable and the heavens are accessible only to Saints and Immortals . . .

THE RUYI SCEPTER

Samples of Ruyi : http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/life/2007-10/24/content_11569400.htm

Ruyi of Jade (Upper Nobility)
Ruyi of Ivory (Lower Nobility)

Ruyi of Gold (Aristocracy) or
Ruyi of Precious Wood (Persons above 60 or those who belong to the lower Aristocracy only).

The Mace of Parliament equivalent is the ‘Stave of Authority’ (typically carved with an appropriate variable animal or plant totem) carried and stored only by Clan Associations with links to the older era, ranks as aristocracy.

c) The White Jade Ruyi being originally considered as a congealed celestial substance is only issued by the Imperial Court to balance the lack of a spiritual link of the Aristocracy and Nobility to the power of the fly whisk Bearing Celestial and higher order Literati-Occultist. One may not carry the Ruyi without state permission. One may gain permission ONLY by application from the Grand Master of a School which does have access and proof of skill. Noblemen schooled in the occult arts may carry both.

Full version may of the above may be found in ICCR’s next publication on behalf of the Orthodox Taoist schools who are invited to pledge loyalty to the Dragon Throne :

301 Bearing of Genteel Arms : Companion Booklet to : The Language of the Fan

Diagram bridging Confucianism and Taoism – 6 Arts (Wushi), Confucian (Jue Shi), Taoism (Jue Shi)

The Taoist Celestial Sphere (Showing the true Taoist Constellations)

As Tao is Eternal, long live Fatherland China.

Posted by T.E. Yu on behalf of the Pater H

Attenuation of Chinese Culture

Faustian bargains leave public rich but culture weakened – Global Times | May 27, 2012 19:10 – Susanne Weigelin-Schwiedrzik, vice-rector of the University of Vienna

Chinese New Year Concert held on 13th January 2012 at Vienna Musikverein.

China’s growing power is unmistakable, but cultural values and civil society often seem to be lagging behind the nation’s new strength. Two experts discussed these issues at the Shanghai Forum 2012, hosted by Fudan University on May 26-28.

In ancient China, both the nation and society were powerful. According to John K. Fairbank’s studies, ancient China had a very special governance pattern, one that could manage the relationship between central and local authorities well. He believes that in ancient China, civil society was a powerful partner of the nation.

R. Bin Wong, director of the UCLA Asia Institute, holds that in ancient China, the nation’s power lay in its capability to maintain unity, and the nation’s political symbolic meanings exceeded its practical efficiency. Meanwhile, civil society’s power lay in its autonomy and its supervision of the nation.

In the 19th century, European modern nations emerged, which were powerful not only militarily, but were able to transform economic growth into national strength. This became the biggest threat and challenge that China faced. China then began to seek a political system which could not only address such challenges, but stand in accordance with China’s unique political culture. To a certain degree, this process is still going on.

The Chinese nationalists established a new government through learning from Japan and the Soviet Union. However, the nation was still very weak. On the one hand it was weak militarily and wasn’t able to control economy and society. On the other hand traditional China’s ability to maintain unity was lost, due to both domestic resistance and interference by imperialism.

In Mao’s era, things changed. The nation appeared very powerful – both militarily and in its ability to control economy and society. And its ideological appeal exceeded its actual efficiency. But after the Great Leap Forward movement (1958-61), the government’s ability to control society was undermined, and some local protesting forces became powerful.

The initial achievements of China’s reform and opening-up lay in the full mobilization of social vigor. And society’s economic vigor began to transform into national strength. Today’s China looks more similar to European nations.

However, a social participation system in accordance with China’s unique culture, which could better deal with the rising social vigor, is still missing. Many people are talking about where China is heading today, but no one could give an answer yet.

Cultural values missing

Xu Jilin, deputy director and history professor at the Si-mian Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities, East China Normal University. The 21st century actually began in 2008, when the US-led developed world was stricken by a severe financial crisis and emerging countries rose with the Beijing Olympic Games as a symbol. Within China, there are generally three kinds of views toward China’s rise. Some liberals believe that China’s rise is a product of globalization, and there’s no special secret. Some believe that China’s rise is simply a repetition of government-promoted East Asian “miracle” in the Four Asian Tigers last century. The third view is that there’s a unique China model.

There’s no need to talk further about China’s national strength, since it has become the second largest economy in the world. I believe if Confucius or Zhu Xi, a Confucian scholar (1130-1200), woke up today, they wouldn’t recognize today’s Chinese. The biggest change lies in the mentality and attitude of ordinary Chinese. Today’s Chinese are most similar to Europeans in the 19th century; the prevalence of a Faustian spirit, the strong sense of competence, the untiring pursuit of wealth and strength, as well as a strong belief in social Darwinism. This has become a strong drive for China. Today in China, especially in coastal areas, we have so many rational systems which stress efficiency and orderly management in various fields.  But we still lack civil reforms that are clearly value-oriented. Ancient China was powerful not in the European way, but because it had invisible appeal. It appealed to the world through the strength of its culture.

Today things are totally different. The strength of culture has greatly faded. We are very powerful economically, but the whole society lacks a clear set of values, and basic ethical bottom lines are repeatedly violated. We do need further reforms, especially political ones, to resume our cultural strength. China is quite prominent on the international stage nowadays, and any of its moves may have a strong effect, especially in the developing world. Historically, China undertook its responsibilities as a great civilization. It must repeat this today through dialogue with the worlds’ mainstream civilizations and improving its own clear values and systems. Only then can the whole world be really convinced that China has risen.

ICCR Notes :

The best way to convince the world that China has risen again, would be revival of a ethnic Han Constitutional Monarch and revival of the Dragon-Throne after the ethnic Manchu one was deposed in 1911. 101 years hence as ICCR now lobbies for . . .

I dressed to impress but ended up depressed – by Bridget O’Donnell (China Daily) – Updated: 2012-04-24 10:06

My appearance stood out like a sore thumb – but not because I was the only foreign guest in attendance at the banquet.

No, it was my ensemble. I was wearing my newly tailored qipao (a Chinese traditional dress), the silk fabric of which had a lovely deep-fuchsia tone.

It was embroidered with gold-colored leaves and similarly hued buttons. I paired off the number with heels and even got a manicure to match the dress’ golden stitching.

There was just one problem: I was at a Chinese wedding. Used to the lavish traditions of Western weddings, I had no idea the dress code for a Chinese wedding wouldn’t be, shall we say, formal.

I mean, really – how could I have known the other guests in attendance would show up in sweaters, sneakers and jeans? It was my first Chinese wedding, after all.

(Yeah, yeah, a simple Google search for “Chinese wedding guest dress code” beforehand probably would’ve saved me from committing such a blundering social faux pas.)

“I look like an idiot,” I later lamented to Maggie, a Beijing friend who had invited me to the wedding. She could only laugh at my foolish error.

I came to learn – much too late, unfortunately – that the dress code for Chinese weddings is casual. In fact, wearing something too fancy could come off as rude.

“You don’t want to try to be more important than the host,” my Chinese tutor later told me.

It’s a far cry from Western weddings, where guests are expected to adhere to a formal dress code. Show up in jeans, and you might as well be wearing a huge sign saying, “Kick me, I have no respect for social norms!”

Still, that will never comfort me from the fact that somewhere out there exist cringe-worthy photos of me posing with the newlywed couple at the banquet.

I can see the two of them now, looking through their wedding photo album and wondering just what exactly that clueless foreigner in the qipao was thinking.

But the dress didn’t turn nearly as many heads at the wedding as it did in public later that afternoon.

After the ceremony ended, Maggie and I decided on a whim to take a stroll down Beijing’s Chang’an Avenue – it was a beautiful and clear day, after all. But without a change of clothes on me, I was forced to stick it out in the qipao.

As we walked from Joy City Mall to Tian’anmen Square, it became evident that the qipao wasn’t only too dressy for Chinese weddings – so too was it unwelcome at Starbucks, public restrooms and the south gate of the Forbidden City during peak hours on the weekend.

We passed hundreds of shoppers and tourists. I caught more than one person giving me strange looks. Even other foreigners stared at me.

I must’ve looked like that kind of overeager tourist who buys traditional garments from far-away lands without really understanding their cultural significance – a tacky and kitschy way of commemorating a culture.

By mid-afternoon, my feet were aching – the heels had taken their toll – so Maggie and I took a moment to rest on a bench.

Then out of nowhere, an elderly Chinese man came up to where we were sitting, cameraphone in hand, and started not-so-discreetly taking photos of me. He threw back his head in hearty laughter every time he snapped. I couldn’t help but wonder if the qipao had something to do with it, though perhaps I was just being paranoid.

After the picture incident, Maggie and I walked to Wangfujing before parting ways.

I immediately hailed a cab – I couldn’t wait to get home and change out of the dress that had been the source of so many woes that day. But before I stepped in, I paused for a second after catching my reflection in the window of a nearby shop.

The qipao may have been over the top, but, hey, at least fuschia is my color.

ICCR Notes :

In the true upper crust, you will find that weddings will indeed be as you expected. Also among the common venues in public which are largely middle class, the upper class people who do wear qipaos will never be seen. It’s like those sedan chair days where VIPs are never seen at all except at office, officiating at venues or at home or at their favourite boutique or hotel gathering where the boutique will bring goods to display to top qipao wearing clientale – try hanging around some respectable ‘tai tais’ (or formal er nai 二奶 or xiao san 小三 . . . mistresses ad infinitum . . . ) of good families and their poorer but ‘reverse hanger-on’ official’s wives instead – those that have merely money and those that have power tend to comfortably mix though graft issues loom. Qipao will not be found among the sports car driving escorts or the nouveau riche, but the chauffer driven wives of magnates and old families living off inheritances forged generations ago, will be where the true bulk of qipao (again I stress hanfu is Chinese not qipao) wearers can be found.

Don’t sweat the ‘idiot factor’ for just being way above the 99% type league in day to day venues, and while the form of the qipao or cheongsum is actually Manchu (the author and so many VIPs should be wearing HANFU), the colour and material subtleties should also be noted. Fuschia is a quasi-dominant colour, with red and yellow (almost never worn due to implications of royalty, except by the top 10 lists for that particular year) over fuschia. Frankly the way this article is titled, one would almost feel that China Daily had little appreciation of the Manchu dress . . . try the more positivist article from People’s Daily below.

ICCR Notes :

The top class venue (or even government department) needs to put their menial workers in proper uniforms to convey a sense of ‘class’ and perhaps cleaning masks or even goggles as well to both depersonalise the workers (who are not intended to interact with the visitors at any rate) as well. When people who dress and look like the average person you meet on the street are found doing menial work, China ends up conveying a sense of ‘all regular people are menial workers’. The uniform thus becomes a delineation and barrier for protection of the dignity of the menial worker and the separation between menial workers and Chinese commoner at large. Any ‘star’ establishment should be well aware of such nuance, more so being Chinese and brought up in an environment of nuances.

This is in fact, coarse, iron-profession coarse, and reflective further by extension to the PLA and tenuous links to the CPPCC. People are affected subliminally and while the sense of things do not immediately make their effects and attitudes known, over a decade and generation, the subliminal and psychic effects could be corrosive to the ‘sense of class level’ and hence work ethic of Chinese in general.

Larger and government establishments should require those ‘daily clothes wearing ‘ menials to don a neutral modern menial uniform (for 2-3 star establishments and mid tier city government departments) and the loose fitting ‘samfu’ type menial uniforms with Chinese characteristics for 4-5 star establishments and upper tier city government departments). A 潔Jié neck lanyard and tag for 2-3 star, or 潔Jié stylized panel perhaps for 4-5 star (with particularly obnoxious looking persons becoming hirable by using masks – to not offend some of the visitors with delicate tastes at the same time allowing them to earn a living and yet offer some of that ‘oriemtal mystique’ at the same time . . . ).

The utilitarian and unadorned cotton samfu. The panel is an important feature of the the ‘visible’ working classes and covey a sense of identity in many ways.

The cotton samfu worn by (i) Security Guard on Right with 兵bīng panel (only professionally trained guards display this panel – think ‘Gurka’, detail colours and weapon size indicate rank), (ii) professionally trained servants/Samsui women (Red head wear means Construction, Black headwear means Menial) 仆 pū panel hidden under work aprons and (iii) Translator/Tour Guide and PA with 隶 lì panel (lost tourists can always count on these multilingual guides on their rounds) are often seen except at tourist venues or large residences, . The 奴 nú panels are not in use anymore, indentured slavery is no longer applied on prisoners though, who knows the state apparatus might bring the practice back via work gangs for criminals wasting tax funds in prisons!

Cheongsam culture booms in Shanghai (People’s Daily Overseas Edition) 08:22, May 29, 2012 – Edited and translated by People’s Daily Online

Embroidered silk upon silk. Women wearing cheongsams pose at a ceremony under the theme “Promoting Cheongsam Culture, Cultivating Elegance” at the Shanghai Oriental Art Center on May 20, in order to carry forward the Chinese cheongsam culture.

It has been a bit cold in Shanghai recently, but that did not stop more than 2,000 cheongsam fans from attending the fifth annual gathering of the Shanghai Cheongsam Salon Couturier. T.H. Grand Dame (Hon.) Wang Weiyu, Z.D.Y.W. (ICCR nominee 2012, confirmation pending)) of the House of Zi, Royal State of Wei, is the owner of Shanghai Couturiers.

A large number of tourists and local residents paused to appreciate the women of various ages wearing colorful fitting cheongsams, when they appeared before the iconic sundial in the Century Avenue.

The booming cheongsam culture among Shanghainese women forms a fine contrast to the popularity of Han Chinese clothing among young people. With wine red curly hair, Wang Weiyu, 65, who wore a red cheongsam and exquisite pearl accessories, caught much attention at the ceremony.

Wang has been obsessed with cheongsams for several decades. Fascinated by the pictures of singers and her mother wearing cheongsams, she became deeply attracted to the traditional Chinese dress. After she retired in 2007, Wang established the Shanghai Cheongsam Salon to encourage women to wear cheongsams to show themselves. The membership of this unique salon has grown from 45 to more than 400 people, covering women from all walks of life.

Although she has been already a grandmother, Wang remains elegant and beautiful, with her wrinkles wiped away by gentle smile.

All members of the salon are graceful and confident, and talk decently, thanks to the changes brought about by cheongsams,” she said.

Wearing cheongsams, the salon’s members have visited Japan, South Korea, and Mediterranean countries in the past five years. Their beauty has amazed and been appreciated by local residents.

At an average age of 55, the members proposed to set May 20 as the China Cheongsam Day, in hopes that every Chinese woman will wear a cheongsam on that day to show feminine gentleness and nobleness.

Most of the salon’s members are retired women, but many girls born in the 1980s have applied to join after learning about the salon. Wang is glad that more and more young girls like to wear cheongsams, including many overseas returnees. She said that she would then focus on promoting cheongsams on campuses in order to pass the culture on to the younger generation.

Chi Yiwei, who majored in flight attendance at the Zhonghua Vocational School in Shanghai, wore a cheongsam for the first time on that day. She and eight of her schoolmates wore improved cheongsams, and walked hand in hand with Wang in front of the sundial before the night fell to have a unique initiation rite. “The Oriental-style cheongsams are amazingly beautiful. I will wear a cheongsam in all future major ceremonies in my life,” Chi said excitedly.

Looking at the 18-year-old girls, Wang, who is an outstanding lecturer in Shanghai’s “A Million Families Learn Etiquette” project, said gently that the salon will recruit more women who like cheongsams in the second half of the year, and teach them cheongsam etiquette, so they will be beautiful both inside and outside.

Two young girls came to Wang while she chatted, and said a little shyly that they want to join the salon. Several older women wearing cheongsams were also waiting to talk with Wang about the traditional dress.

ICCR Notes :

Cheongsum is quite utilitarian and suitable for the travelling upper crust although what could be considered high culture (as in ballroom or extreme luxury) would be the voluminious court hanfu (not the utilitarian hanfu) coupled with the matching ‘lotus foot’ simulating Manchu horse-hoof shoes instead of stilettos. The unfortunate trend of using standard Cheongsum-Qipao instead of ‘Samfu’ in hospitality industries and restaurants though has created some fashion issues (perhaps intentionally especially where unsuitable colours are used), though the Court Qipao with proper head gear is sufficiently distinct. Conversely Cheongsum does look quite formal in travelling settings, with Court Qipao conveying a (still modest as opposed to hanfu) sense of luxury entirely unsuitable as street wear or any typical venue, especially ‘Westernized’ ones.

As for footwear, we advocate use of Manchu Court Platforms or Manchu horse-hoof shoes (if not outright footbinding – consensual of course) over stillettos for all ballrooom events as well, stilettos are after all not part of the ensemble of oriental fare, both are best worn in spacious vistas, as stilettos convey a coarseness and vulgar masculine sexual dominance that Manchu horse-hoof shoes (though named in a most fetish – oriented manner) do not. Manchu horse-hoof shoes instead impart a sense of daintiness and delicacy to the walk as opposed to the the dominatrix or ‘trans-subculture’ effect of stillettos.

Manchu Court Shoes in lieu of actual Footbinding

For a start, beyond Qipao-Cheongsum, a culture of Court Qipao, and luxury hanfu could be adopted by China’s biggest bosses and their wives or families and top staff. This could create a sense of hierarchy that seems to be swallowed up by the Western suit and Western gowns. Indeed at the very top, we now see the resurgent trend of keeping utilitarian suits of armour in their offices, where boards of directors attend their quarterly or bi-annual ‘Warrior’s Camps’ to bond over practice and matching of skills in horseriding, charioteering, archery, wrestling and swordplay. Transition to wearing cheongsum or hanfu for women on a regular basis for top level staff and their wives, or any from the upper crust is but a step away to better include Women in this aspect of re-culturalisation of China. Sumptuary basis designed and coloured high quality sets of ‘Sunday Best’ robes for official gatherings and related culture events could also be made and marketed to the upper castes in time to come as the Imperial Court in re-formation finds renaissance in the ever appreciating value of traditional culture.

Typical Chinese Armour (accompanying stylized metallic battle mask not shown here)

Long live the Fatherland.

Articles collated by Yu Tian-er (Temp. Sec. to HH TMH Lord Protector Cai Jinyue, Marquisate of Shangcai )

International Committee of the Red Taijitu (ICRT) and the Saint Hua Tuo Ambulance Brigade

Introduction : International Committee of the Red Taijitu (ICRT) and the Saint Hua Tuo Ambulance Brigade

Enjoying the fame of  “Aesculapius”, Hua Tuo (145 – 208A.D.) is a famous highly-skilled doctor of the Eastern Han Dynasty in China. He was born in a common Shizu family in the late Eastern Han Period and lived in the same period with another renowned doctor Zhang Zhongjing. Based on his rich experience in medical treatment, Hua Tuo compiled a medical book, which was regrettably not handed down. The existing Zhongzang Classic by Hua Tuo was compiled by people in the Song Dynasty, probably containing partial content of Hua Tuo’s book remaining at that time.

Therapies and body-building methods created by Hua Tuo are of great significance as a milestone in Chinese medical history. They include the method of externally extruding heart, mouth-To-mouth artificial respiration, anesthesia method —alcohol-auxiliary powder for anesthesia, and the body-building Five Mimic-Animal Exercise. Moreover, surgical operation originated by him was canonized by later generations. The legend of Hua Tuo’s curing Guan Yu by cutting bone can be found in Romance of the Three Kingdoms. Hua Tuo was hereby respectfully called “Originator of Surgery” by later generations.

Other than systematically accepting ancient experience in medical treatment, Hua Tuo gave top priority to the application of folk experience in this regard. He traveled to numerous places, collecting herbal medicine and learning medicine-related knowledge from local people. Meanwhile, he collected from common people large quantities of prescriptions which were later frequently applied by him to treat diseases. There still exist Hua Tuo Memorialized Grave in Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province and Huazu Temple in Peixian County, which were built by people to commemorate Hua Tuo.  In the opinion of contemporary western scholars, Hua Tuo is an outstanding representative of oriental medicine in ancient times and can be on a par with Hippocrates, the father of western medicine.

Recommended Reading

Immortal Saint Shennong

Shennong is one of the legendary ancestors of the Chinese nation. He’s also known as the Yan Emperor of the Three Emperors and Five Sovereigns in ancient China. He is believed to have taught people how to identify different kinds of plants and how to grow crops so as to survive and bring up children.

The beautiful legend of Shennong tasting hundreds of herbs shows that Shennong discovered Chinese medicine. It is said that in order to relieve people of afflictions and sufferings, Shennong decided to taste all plants to find out herbs with medicinal effects and capable of curing diseases.

After going through all kinds of hardships and difficulties, Shennong tasted all herbs and ended up transmogrified into a spiritual form of immortality from poisonous herbs. He sacrificed his own life in the final act that saw his spirit become immortal though Shennong’s physical form died. To commemorate him, people honored him as “Medicine Saint”. This was among tje more famous of early attempts at immortality from alchemy and cinnabar.

For thousands of years, Shennong’s great spirit of “benefiting and rescuing people” have been highly respected and praised. It was this very spirit that spurred a lot of great physicians and pharmacologists of later ages like Bian Que, Li Shizhen and Sun Simiao to make unremitting efforts to carry on the great tradition of “saving the people and serving the society” in Chinese medicine, bringing it to a great height of development.

Immortal Saint Ge Hong

Ge Hong was a noted Chinese physician lived between 284 and 364 AD. He had a sobriquet of “Baopuzi” (The Master Who Embraces Simplicity), so his best known work was also called Baopuzi.

Ge Hong was said to be a Taoist immortal, who lived to a great age. In fact, Ge Hong was a historical figure in real life. He was not just a Taoist theorist, but more of a renowned alchemist. According to his work Baopuzi, he did lots of chemical experiments in his lifetime£¬including the experiment to obtain arsenic using the three substances of realgar, rosin and niter. The book also recorded his making of mercury ointment for scab and other diseases by using lard as the bodying agent, while similar therapies were nonexistent in European medicine until the 10th century. Ge Hong’s alchemy received a lot of attention from academia of home and abroad, with some of his works being translated into English and French and gaining popularity across the world.

Saint Zhang

Zhang Zhongjing is the most famous of China’s ancient herbal doctors. He is known for his book, which was later divided into two parts: Shang Han Lun and Chin Kuei Yao Lueh [Jin Gui Yao Lue]. In particular, the section known as the Shang Han Lun became the fundamental text for all traditional herb prescribing. Not only did it contain over 100 effective formulas (many of them still used today), but the text implied a theoretical framework that led to hundreds of books analyzing, explaining, and reforming it. The other section is best known for some of the formulas, such as the gynecological remedy Tang-kuei and Peony Formula [Danggui Shaoyao San] which is today applied to infertility, disorders during pregnancy, prevention of miscarriage, and post-partum weakness. His work might have been lost had it not been for the efforts of Wang Shu-Ho.

Ye the Celestial (Tianshi)

Ye Tianshi (1667-1746) was a famous physician of the Qing Dynasty from Wuxian County of Jiangsu Province. Under the influences of his grandfather Zifan and father Yangsheng, both of whom had a masterful command of medicine, Ye Tianshi accumulated a wealth of medical knowledge and became a renowned physician. As a child, Ye Tianshi was fond of learning and studied under 17 teachers in various times. He made flexible use of ancient medical theories and experiences in his diagnosing processes, which involved his original insights. Later, he composed the book of Treatise on Epidemic Fevers by drawing on the strengths of different doctors. The work contributed a great deal to the study of epidemic febrile diseases. But Ye didn’t write many books in his lifetime. His disciples compiled some books based on his experiences, including A Guide to Clinical Practice with Medical Records and The Collection of Dr. Ye’s Medical Records etc. There are lots of legends about Ye’s modest learning and flexible diagnosis circulating among the people. There was no reference if this Celestial of the “Templi Ordo Literatum’ (Order of Letters) based in the Wen Temple of Suzhou, managed to obtain immortality.

Origins of Vaccination

Smallpox vaccination is the way to prevent the disease initiated in ancient China. Smallpox was called “vaccinatable boil” in China at that time, hence the name of the prevention measure—”boil vaccination”, which is done by slightly infecting someone with the disease. The person will then get immunity against smallpox after slightly suffering from it and they’ll never contract the disease again. Originally, people were afraid of contracting smallpox, but they later deliberately get it for the purpose of vaccination. That was a great change, which was brought about by the experiences accumulated in the process of combating the disease.

Chinese smallpox vaccination began to be introduced overseas in the early 17th century. First in 1688, Russia asked to send doctors to learn the skill. Later, Korea, Japan and other countries all followed suit.

Articles re-posted and collated from various sources in : http://www.cultural-china.com/

Meridien Systems :

In addition to chi (qi), traditional Chinese medicine recognizes a subtle energy system by which chi (qi) is circulated through the body. This transportation system is referred to as the channels or meridians. There are twelve main meridians in the body, six yin and six yang, and each relates to one of the Zangfu, or organs.

To better visualize the concept of chi (qi), and the meridians, think of the meridians as a river-bed, over which water flows and irrigates the land; feeding, nourishing and sustaining the substance through which it flows. (In Western medicine, the concept would be likened to the blood flowing through the circulatory system.) If a dam were placed at any point along the river, the nourishing effect that the water had on the whole river would stop at the point the dam was placed.

The same is true in relation to chi (qi) and the meridians. When chi (qi) is blocked, the rest of the body that was being nourished by the continuous flow, now suffers. Illness and disease can result if the flow is not restored.

Acupuncture is one tool used to restore the flow of chi (qi), by inserting needles into the acupuncture points (located on the meridians). These insertions are said to clear any residing blockages, or dams, thus freeing the river to better feed the body in its entirety.

Red Taijitu Organisation Concept

(Many thanks to ICCR for making permission to print below sections on the Red Taijitu Organisation Concept)

Basic Concept for the International Committee of the Red Taijitu

Several Articles on Food and Drink

Chinese Alcohol and Chinese Tableware : China airport drink name stirs spirited mockery AFPAFP – Sun, May 27, 2012

A decision to name an airport in southwest China after a local spirits brand has provoked widespread derision online and controversy around the country, reports said Sunday. Authorities in Yibin, in Sichuan province, said their move to name the new airport “Wuliangye” after a local liquor would have a positive impact on the city and the company. A Yibin government spokesman said the State Council, China’s cabinet, had approved the decision, the Global Times newspaper reported Sunday.

Wuliangye is a well-known top-end spirits brand in China. Its eponymous flagship product is a white spirit made from the distillation of five grains, including sticky rice and sorghum. The group has more than 40,000 employees, according to its website, and the company is based a few kilometres (miles) from Yibin airport, which according to media reports will have a capacity of 800,000 passengers a year by 2020. Various experts quoted by newspapers said that christening an airport with a trademark contravened both the law and the custom that airport names should refer to their geographic locations.

Wuliangye Baijiu

Chinese Internet users waded into the controversy with derision.

Ha, ha, another new example of the collusion between the government and the business world,” Wu Yupeng mocked on his Sina weibo microblog.

Chinese Distillers Maotai & Wuliangye Enter “Most Valuable Luxury Brands” List, Claim Not To Be Luxury – by Jing Daily – Published: January 12, 2012

8th Hurun Research Institute Report Finds Maotai More Valuable Than Mercedes-Benz and Chanel

The top brand of 2010 among NobleChinese readers: Wuliangye baijiu

This week, the Shanghai-based research firm Hurun Report issued its latest list of the world’s most valuable luxury brands, and alongside global stalwarts such as Louis Vuitton and Hermes in the top ten were two Chinese standouts — the baijiu distilleries Maotai (茅台) and Wuliangye (五粮液). In all, French brands accounted for four spots in the top ten, Germany and China two each, and one each from Italy and Switzerland. Breaking categories down further, the list was composed of four fashion brands, two auto brands, two spirits brands, and two watch brands. Noticeably absent from this year’s list were Apple — which would have topped the list, had it been considered a luxury brand this time around — and the Chinese cigarette maker Zhonghua (中华), which would have ranked sixth, ahead of Chanel.

Led by Louis Vuitton, here is the Hurun Report’s top ten most valuable luxury brands for 2011, ranked by brand value:

1.) Louis Vuitton (France): US$20.5 billion
2.) Hermes (France): $14.5 billion
3.) BMW (Germany): $13 billion
4.) Maotai (China): $12 billion
5.) Mercedes-Benz (Germany): $10 billion
6.) Chanel (France): $9 billion
7.) Wuliangye (China): $7 billion
8.) Gucci (Italy): $6.5 billion
9.) Rolex (Switzerland): $6 billion
10.) Cartier (France): $5.9 billion

While most brands would be thrilled to be included in such a list, yesterday Maotai spokesman Ye Yuanhong (叶远鸿) categorically disavowed his brand’s inclusion, telling Chinese media, “In regards to being included in Hurun’s luxury brand list, Maotai has never claimed itself eligible to be considered a luxury brand. We don’t know anything about Hurun’s list, and wish to distance ourselves from it.”

Maotai has had a very uncomfortable relationship with the word “luxury” for quite some time. In November 2011, stories broke among Chinese media that Maotai would apply to be listed as an “international luxury brand.” As the story went viral, Maotai Group Honorary Chairman, Ji Keliang (季克良) denied that Maotai had such plans, saying he is “opposed to Maotai baijiu being referred to as a luxury good.” In response to Maotai’s statements, Wuliangye Group chairman, Tang Qiao (唐桥) said his company’s baijiu also is not a luxury good, saying that wines like Chateau Lafite — which see massive price fluctuations — belong in the luxury segment. Funny coming from brands that produce bottles of baijiu that (when new) can cost US$20,000 or more per bottle, or (at auction) 20 times that.

Still, the humble statements put out this week by Maotai and Wuliangye aren’t that surprising from a Chinese perspective. As Future Marketing Advisory Group (未来营销咨询集团) chairman Li Zhiqi (李志起) told Jinghua Daily (京华时报) yesterday, though brands like Maotai and Wuliangye count as luxury brands purely from a price standpoint, they lack the “luxury brand genes” of a Gucci or Mercedes-Benz. As such, they’ve got a great deal of brand-building left to do before they can stand alongside European luxury giants. As Li added, since they don’t have the global draw of other brands on Hurun’s top ten, and are infused with “Chinese-ness,” the actual brand value from a worldwide standpoint of Chinese brands like Maotai and Wuliangye are not yet clear.

Wuliangye Baijiu in process of fermentation.

Altogether, it’s been an interesting week for the “non-luxury-brand” Maotai. Another list put out this week by the Hurun Report — focusing on the top ten high-end brands for Chinese millionaires to give as gifts — listed Maotai as #5, just ahead of Apple.

Wine History in China

China has an over 5000-year history of wine brewery. In China there is a legend of “Du Kang making the wine”. Hence wine is also called Du Kang. About three thousand years ago, the Chinese people in the Shang and Zhou Dynasties created compound zymotechnics of yeast and brewed yellow wine on a large scale. About one thousand years ago, Chinese people in the Song Dynasty invented the method of distillation. And since then distilled spirit has become the main type of wine in China.

In the thousands of years of civilization, wine has permeated almost all aspects of social life. In ancient time wine was something indispensable for all important occasions, otherwise the rites could not be reckoned as completed. There must be wine for every important festival, which could increase the atmosphere of festivity. There must be wine for wedding ceremonies and funerals. Some monarchs had their empire lost because of their addiction to wine while some scholars left behind masterpieces after drinking wine. Wine is no longer something to be understood as purely material, it has evolved into a culture that plays an important role in social life.

Du Kang was regarded as the forefather of wine production in China. So the Chinese people of later generations usually call wines “Du Kang”.

Du Kang

It is said that Du Kang was also called Shaokang and lived in the Xia Dynasty about 3900 years ago. He lived on graze when he was young, and often forgot to have meals which he brought and hung on the tree. Later, he found that the taste of meal he left on the tree had changed, and the juices were especially luscious. This interested him and made him think and study again and again. Finally, he learned the principle of natural fermentation and tried to improve his method. At last, a complete method of wine production was invented. Although this is only a legend, Du Kang was still regarded by later people as the forefather of wine production in China. Furthermore, wines are named “Du Kang Wine” by some people.

Stories of “Du Kang Getting Eight Immortals Drunk” and “Du Kang Getting Liu Ling Drunk” all are famous stories about the wine. Cao Cao, a famous king during the Three Kingdoms period, wrote in his Short Song that “What can eliminate my melancholy? Only Du Kang” It is said  the winebibber Li Bai, a famous poet of the Tang Dynasty, once made a special trip to Yichuan to look for the trace left by Du Kang. Numerous heroes were once infatuated with Du Kang wines.

According to a legend, the site of the wine production by Du Kang is the Du Kang Channel seven kilometers northwest of the city zone of Baishui County, Shanxi Province. Baishui County is also the hometown of Cang Jie and Cai Lun. It is said that Du Kang was buried beside his wine production site, and that his tomb exists still. In addition, it is also said that a Du Kang Temple was built behind his tomb, where a stele was set to commemorate and praise the forefather of production of Du Kang wine.

King Zhou of Shang Dynasty completed the most extravagant drinking in history. The king ordered his people to build a well to be filled with wine. Some people into the well to drink, and because some drowned from alcohol fumes, later ventures of this sort tended to be of lower alcohol content and in larger hot springs with potable water or pre-heated in sauna form pools in open air areas. Swimming and drinking would begin AFTER alcohol content was deemed low enough that the fumes would not overcome the swimmers. Combined with incenses (some of which included organic drugs of a milder type, the wealthy of the earlier era tended to end up (due to absolute power, lack of seperation of powers which led to immense cronyism and nepotism, i.e. the nobleman who was also the general controlling the military AND the main politician who set policy often ended up over-indulged and unable to think or strategise clearly, leading to the downfall of many a dynasty.

Health Preserving through Alcohol

In the 38th chapter of the Dream of the Red Chamber, Daiyu feels slight pain in the heart after having some cold-natured crabmeat. Hence she feels like some liquor. Baoyu hurriedly asks for “liquor in which 合换花 (hé huàn huā or Mimosa Tree Flower) is marinated.” As a little white flower, 合换花 is effective in soothing the nerves and relieving depression (much like the Eastern version of Camomile, only less harsh). Not only can 合换花 dispel cold, but it is also effective in treating Daiyu’s sentimentality and insomnia. Tusu Liquor. In the Grand View Garden, it is customary to present Tusu Liquor on New Year’s Eve. Besides, it is also a type of health-preserving alcohol for Baoyu and others. It is effective in dispelling cold, dispersing damp-heat and preventing diseases.

Preserving Health Through Tea and Alcohol (from Dream of the Red Chamber) with Huan Hua

Yellow Wine

Bayou is especially fond of yellow wine as a kind of health-preserving alcohol. Mild in nature, the yellow wine is not harmful to one’s health but instead very nutritious. As a result, it is very popular among people in the Grand View Garden.

ICCR Notes : This aspect is stressed and noted by ICCR, that the proposed Constitutional Monarch be entirely separate from Religion (to prevent Theocracy), Politics (to prevent Cronyism and clique forming), Military (to prevent abuses and dictatorship by force) and even Commerce (to prevent Plutocracy and a culture of greed, also innovation and comeptitiveness destroying monopolies) to ensure that any decadence would not affect the runnning of the state.

Chinese Wine Decanter and Wine Vessel Sets

The hospitality of the Chinese can be thoroughly seen at banquets. More often than not, communication between people is sublimed during the process of toasting. When a Chinese makes a toast to someone, he often hopes the person to drink more so that his hospitality is delivered. The more the guest drinks, the happier the host will be; if the guest declines to drink, the host may feel loss of face. Therefore, in order to urge guests to drink, multiple means are adopted in China. Chinese wine sets have a long history and come in a wide array of shapes and sizes. In terms of material, there are pottery, bronze, porcelain, jade, glass wine sets and those made with other materials. The ‘zun’ translucent jade/bronze tripod form holders for porcelain vessels are particularly good collector’s commision item and typify the height of.

Zun-form Bronze Drinking Vessel

Pottery wine sets are China’s earliest wine utensils found so far. These sets were extremely popular in the Painted Pottery Culture Period of the Neolithic Age. They were widely used in later ages, especially among the laboring people at the foot of the social ladder. The casting of bronze wine sets started in the Xia Dynasty and became prevailing in the Shang and Zhou Dynasties as well as in the Spring and Autumn and the Warring States Periods. Among these wine sets, the ones modeled after the shapes of animals in nature reflected people’s wish for beautiful things and luck as well as the praying to divinities and auspicious animals for protection. Such sets include tiger, goat, ox and elephant-shaped utensils, etc.

Porcelain wine sets have the highest artistic value, such as the Ming and Qing Dynasty blue-and-white porcelain wine sets painted with landscape, flowers, birds, human figures and stories, giving a sense of beauty and cultural taste to the drinkers in the drinking process. Jade wine sets are an indication of ancient people’s social positions. The nine-dragon jade cup of the Qing Dynasty is ingeniously designed, with nine coiling dragons carved on the cup. The tails of the nine dragons are intertwined with one another. There are small holes at the bottom of the cup leading to the nine tails, so when the cup is filled with wine, the nine tails are also filled up. If an excessive amount of wine is poured in, the wine will naturally stream down, avoiding overdrinking.

Chinese wine sets are elegant and in good taste, with exquisite adornment. Holding the cup, the drinkers are usually overwhelmed with aesthetic feelings, experiencing the cultural and artistic charm of the utensil.

In ancient China, wine sets were also part of the ceremonial system. There was a stringent hierarchy system, under which people of different statuses and positions were supposed to use different wine sets. All types of Chinese wine sets serve as a mirror of ancient Chinese culture.

Notes on Drunken Boxing

Drunken Boxing is a style of boxing that imitates a drunkard in its movements, involving both offensive and defensive skills. The striking features of the boxing are its fast speed and unpredictable changes in beating the opponent. It is also known for its unique appreciating, health-boosting and practical values.

The postures of Drunken Boxing are pretty much like the staggering movements of a drunkard, but the boxing is actually well choreographed with no drunkenness at all. It is a routine of martial art skills involving stringent arm, leg and body movements.

It is said that Drunken Boxing was derived from the fighting skills used by Wu Song, one of the characters in the novel Outlaws of the Marsh, when he beat a hooligan surnamed Jiang after getting drunk, as well as the attacking skills used by Lu Zhishen, also a character in the novel, when he caused an uproar in the mountain as he was drunk. The movements of Drunken Boxing are guided by the principle of “drunken in appearance but not in spirit”.

The major postures include beating, pushing, throwing, rolling, leaping and jumping. While retaining the beauty of body art, all the postures are practical fighting skills.

The boxing has a fairly high requirement on the practitioner in terms of the person’s flexibility in the waist, legs and joints as well as the functions of internal organs, willpower and moral integrity etc. In addition, the performance of the boxing is supposed to give a straight, light and graceful feel. The point was to let the alcohol infuse the lower ‘chakras’ wiith energy that could amplify the qi behind the punch, while keeping the upper energy channels close, the main strain on the physical system, would be on the closure/ipening meridiens. This takes many years to acclimatize, and an alcohol augmented punch can be ‘brick breaking’. ‘bone crushing’ or ’tile piercing’ (typically ‘2 finger punch’) lethal.

Of course, seratonin inducing narcotics aside, other classes of medicinal or nootropic herb enhanced liquors have enjoyed the fame of “the best panacea of all” and tends to the mixture of traditional Chinese medicine and distillate spirits or rice wine which can be conveniently prepared. It is stable in nature, safe and effective. Alcohol a fine semi-polar organic solvent that can easily dissolve all active ingredients in drugs. Thus the drugs and liquor can be complementary to each other,fully enhancing the efficacy of medicine and the curative effect.

Other organic substances (not necessarily Cinnabar) have been experimented with by the grandmasters, and of those who understand the ‘impressions’ or ‘dents’ left by this particular esoteric class of ‘Qi Practicioner’ are able to ‘rip the ether’ and cause ripples through reality for hundreds or even thousands of years.

Confucius Institute to promote Chinese food culture – by Pan Xiaotian (People’s Daily Overseas Edition) – 13:59, May 25, 2012 – Edited and translated by Li Kunlun, People’s Daily Online

Chinese Banquet

The headquarters of the Confucius Institute and Lee Kum Kee, a Hong Kong-based food company, signed a memorandum of cooperation at the Beijing Language and Culture University to carry forward Chinese food culture on May 24. The program will enable foreigners taste “China on the tip of tongue” while promoting the spread of Chinese Language. According to the memorandum, both parties will work together to write the Chinese food culture textbook to enrich Confucius Institute courses, establish a food culture experience center, send a professional chef to participate in the characteristic teaching of Confucius Institute, to make Chinese teaching and Chinese food culture more and more popular in the world. The project will also provide strong support to the volunteers who teach Chinese language at Confucius Institute.

What is the state banquet? The state banquet is the formal banquet for entertaining the head of state or head of government. The state banquet is mysterious to ordinary people, especially China’s state banquet.

China’s state banquet is generally set up in the Great Hall of the People. The banquet hall here can hold 5000 people at the same time. The dish of China’s state banquet has gathered the cooking style all over China. For the taste suitable for the presidents of various countries, several generations of cooks improve the dish of state banquet meticulously. There are very harsh hygienic requirements in China’s state banquet, for example a cook should change 20 pairs of gloves to cook a dish, and washing hands must pass six procedures.

ICCR Notes :

ICCR proposes a matching and superlative CCTV feature for State standardized Imperial Court Level banquets with exotic cooking materials as a feature alongside features on nature reserves (i.e. rare game like the leopard (leopard fetuses to be exact), bear paws and such . . . ) or from the sea regions (i.e. abalone, seaslug, sharks fin – ICCR recommends that adult sharks at the peak or their breeding ages along with immatured sharks should not be caught and returned to the ocean, ‘blue ocean’ fishing applied . . . perhaps even intentional breed and release programmes to repopulate the ocean . . . ) where the best is cultivated in non GMO natural settings and humanely culled and harvested. See below link for a look at some dishes :

http://english.cntv.cn/program/journeysintime/20110927/113428.shtml

This food feature should target the plutocrats (separately charged according to wealth levels – proceeds going to state charities), gourmands and VVIPs who are not bureaucrats or on state salaries. Upon formation of an Constitutional Monarchy though, the feature will have greater significance as wealth distribution in exchange for social stature towards cultivation of philantropic natures (rather than mercantile) is further encouraged as in your feature on ‘Wuxi Businessmen’. See below link for a look at Wuxi :

http://english.cntv.cn/program/documentary/special/wuxibusinessmen/index.shtml

Silk Scroll Detailing State Banquet

Advanced Dietetics in China

Taoist Elemental Dietetics

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the world is a harmonious and holistic entity where all living beings are viewed in relation to the surrounding environment. Since ancient times, the Chinese have tried to explain different complicated phenomena by creating yin yang or the five elements theories. Man is part of the holistic entity, and takes his cue from nature. He is influenced directly and indirectly by changes in weather and needs to make corresponding physiological and pathological responses. For example, a change of season causes the rate, rhythm, volume and tension of the pulse to vary. The pulse tends to be taut in spring, full in summer, floating in autumn, and sunken in winter. TCM physicians will take this into account when distinguishing the abnormal pulse from the normal. The occurrence, development and change in the pattern of many diseases are seasonal such as wenbing occurring in spring, sun strokes in summer, dryness-related symptoms in autumn, and cold stroke syndromes in winter.

Published in 1330AD, an illustration of Yinshan Zhengyao (Important Principles of Food and Drink) states that spring is appropriate to eat wheat.

However, we can take active measures to prevent disease and maintain good health. One common method is to consume different foods according to the season. The Chinese widely believe that we are what we eat, and most dietary guidelines follow on from nature. According to TCM philosophies, if we imbibe seasonal foods that are similar in nature to the external environment, we remain in harmony with the environment, adapt better to changes in season and stay healthy. The basic applying principle is “nourishing yang in spring and summer time, and nourishing yin in autumn and winter time.” The ancient Chinese realized that in accordance with seasonal changes, yang qi tends to flow outwards and occupies the body surface in spring and summer and therefore, the innards get relatively depleted of yang qi and need replenishing. At the same time, the weather in autumn and winter is cold and dry, and it is important to keep warm and prevent dryness. Through the methods of replenishing yin and nourishing dryness, TCM believes it is a way to build up energy and prepare for the coming seasons.

Preserving Health through Tea and Alcohol in the Dream of the Red Chamber

As a literary classic, the Dream of the Red Chamber not only presents numerous vivid artistic figures, but also proposes brilliant suggestions concerning food, drink and other respects in health preserving. Health Preserving through Tea Laojunmei. Laojunmei is the favorite health-preserving tea of Jia Zheng’s mother. As one type of silver-needle tea, it comes from Junshan Mountain in Dongting Lake of Hunan Province. With a bright color and fragrant taste, Laojunmei not only preserves one’s health, but also cultivates one’s character. Therefore, it becomes Matron Jia’s favorite health-preserving tea. The Daughter’s Tea. The Daughter’s Tea is also called Pu’er Tea. In the 63rd chapter of the Dream of the Red Chamber, Baoyu feels uncomfortable after he has some noodles. Then he has some Pu’er Tea, which instantly improves his appetite. In addition, the tea is also effective in stimulating the menstrual flow. Liu’an Tea. It is Jia Baoyu’s favorite health-preserving tea.

Kuding tea or Ligustrum purpurascens, commonly known as Chading, Fuding tea and Gaolu tea, is a particularly bitter-tasting Chinese tea produced mainly in the provinces of Guandong and Fujian. It is one of the most famous types of tea in Chinese history. According to Compendium of Materia Medica (Bencao Gangmu), the medicinal properties associated with Kuding tea include its ability to disperse wind-heat, clear the head and the eyes, alleviate thirst, invigorate digestion, keep up the spirits, resolve toxin, and reduce inflammation as well as lower blood pressure and blood lipids. Kuding tea contains more than 200 elements including Kuding saponins, amino acids, vitamin C, polyphenols, flavonoids, caffeine, protein, etc. The finished product features an aromatic and bitter taste at first and then a slightly sweet and cool taste, as well as many medical functions such as dispersing heat and preventing sunstroke, clearing the eyes, benefiting the brain, alleviating thirst, increasing the discharge of urine, strengthening the heart, relieving the cough, lowering blood pressure, reducing weight, preventing cancers, slowing aging, and enhancing blood circulation. Therefore it is usually dubbed as “healthy tea”, “beauty care tea”, “slimming tea”, “anti-hypertensive tea”, and “longevity tea”.

The leaves of Kuding tea are 1.5 to 2 times larger than those of ordinary tea. They are oval, thick, leather-like and hairless. The dark green fresh leaves are particularly radiant. The tea, made of tender buds, looks thick, curled and hairless. Genuine Kuding tea tastes bitter at first and then slightly sweet, but never acerb, spicy, smelly, sour or others; it can be infused several times. Otherwise, it is fake and shoddy. One kilo of Kuding tea made of tender leaves can be brewed with 150 ml water. The tea tastes strongly fragrant even after it has been brewed for 8 to 10 times, which far outshines the ordinary tea.

Dietetics for Women

Matriarchs of old families had her own ways to maintain her beauty even at an old age. Some keep the habit of having intricately woven strands of ginseng and angelica in their mouths to nourish their aging bodies, or had secret ointments or special diets from rare substances like pearl powder.  According to historical records, special lymph node stimulating taiji regimens were used by many female Chinese aristocrats and nobility of the day.

Dates

Chinese date or jujube, has been listed in the five important fruits, namely, peach, plum, waxberry, apricot and red date, since ancient times. It has a long history.  According to historical statistics, the red date is a special species with a long tradition and a high reputation in its birthplace China. Archeologists have found the fossil of a date core in the cultural site of Feiligang, Xinzheng, which is a testament to its 8000-plus-year history of production in China. As early as the Western Zhou Dynasty, fermented red dates were used to make red date wine, which was served as a tribute or used to treat guests and friends. In the remote antiquity, people had found that red dates could supplement nutrition and improve health conditions. Han Feizi recorded how the Qin State used red dates and chestnuts to relieve famines. That explains why the folks have been regarded the red date as one of the major crops. The medical properties of the red dates were found and recorded quite early in history. For example, starting from Shengnong’s Classic of Materia Medica (Shennong Bencao Jing), medical works from the succeeding dynasties also included relevant records and increasingly deepened understandings of their abilities to preserve health and cure diseases. Up till now, the red dates have been regarded as an important tonic. According to Compendium of Materia Medica (Bencao Gangmu) written by Li Shizhen, the red dates are sweet and warm-natured; they can nourish the middle warmer and replenish qi, nourish the blood and alleviate thirst; they can be used to cure diseases such as spleen hypofunction, poor appetite and diabetes, qi-blood deficiency, etc. If eaten regularly, they can strengthen the body, and cure diseases such as neurasthenic, imbalance of the spleen and the stomach, indigestion, cough, anemia and over thinness. In particular, they are effective to preserve the liver and prevent cancers. There is a saying, “Three dates a day keeps wrinkles away.” Now, the red dates also serve as one of the major dry fruit ingredients in Chinese cuisines. In about the first century AD, the red dates were introduced to the Mediterranean and West Europe through Syria and in the 19th century to North America from Europe.

Xinzheng dates from Xinzheng, Henan, enjoy the reputation that “Xinzheng dates taste as sweet as honey”.

Yellow River dates from Zaolinping, Suide, Shaanxi feature sweet, soft and savory pulp and are known as “sapodilla plum”.

Gold-thread dates from Leling, Shandong and Cangzhou, Hebei are coreless and rich in sugar; threads can be drawn out if the date is broken off.

Winter dates from Zhanhua, Shandong have a savory taste. Since the dates are big and get ripe in winter, they are also called apple dates, frozen dates and sugar candy dates. It is a rare variety of red dates that gets ripe relatively later than others; the fresh fruits are ready to eat.

White Fungus

Tremella fuciformis, also known as white fungus, snow fungus or silver mushroom, is a type of jelly fungus, which belongs to the genus Tremella, the family Tremellaceae, the kingdom Funji. Highly nutritious, snow fungus contains protein, fat and various amino acids, minerals and glycogen. Altogether 17 kinds of amino acids are included in the protein of snow fungus, and three fourth of the amino acids required by human body can be supplied by it. Snow fungus is rich in various minerals such as calcium, phosphorus, iron, potassium, sodium, magnesium, and sulfur, among which calcium and iron take the largest proportion. There are 643 milligram calcium and 30.4 milligram in per 100 gram of snow fungus. In addition, the snow fungus also contains various kinds of glycogen such as trehalose, pentosan, and mannitol. Highly nutritious, it is a high-quality tonic that can keep the body fit and vigorous. It is often used to make sweet dessert soup. In daily life, it can also be added when you are cooking porridge or pork. In this way, you can enjoy the food and strengthen the body at the same time.

RECOMMENDED READING

During the Ming and Yuan period, several schools of thought evolved attributing disease to different factors, and advocating contrasting approaches to treatment. This was in addition to the Mongol physicians who held their own set of beliefs. Nevertheless, a number of physicians living at this time made a significant contribution to medical development.

Yin Shan Zheng Yao,or Principles of Correct Diet(1330) written by Hu Sihui.

Master Hejian (Liu Wansu)
Liu Wansu (1120-1200), or Master Hejian as his students called him, is credited with founding the Hejian School. A native of Hebei province, he three times turned down an offer from the Jin emperor to practice medicine for the palace and chose instead to practice medicine for the people. He played a significant role in the development of Chinese medicine and is famous for writing a number of works based on the medical classic the Suwen (The Book of Plain Questions).

Liu Wansu’s belief centered on the theory of the five movements (yun) and six influences (qi). He placed particular importance on the elements of fire and heat, and tended to prescribe herbs that have cold properties to treat disease arising from these influences.This is also referred to as the “School of cooling” for the reason. Examples of his frequently prescribed herbs are cassia twig,rehmannia root, ephedra and mint.

Six Doors and Three Methods (Zhang Congzheng)
Zhang Congzheng (1150-1228) had an innovative approach to medical treatment and insisted that the medicines of yesterday could not combat present-day illnesses. He was a military physician and wrote a book called Rumen Shiqin (Therapies for Scholars) based on his observations and research. However, he is best known for his theory of the “six doors and three methods.” The six doors are the six influences (wind, summer heat, dampness, fire, dryness and cold) that Liu Wansu observed, and the three methods refer to therapeutic regimens used to induce sweating, vomiting and purging, that Zhang resorted to frequently. He thought that evil influences were derived from the heavens, the earth and man’s behavior (e.g. what he ate). In order to effect a cure, the evil influences had to be expelled.

Master of the Yishui School (Zhang Yuansu)
Zhang Yuansu (1151-1234) was the founder of the Yishui School, named after his native district in Hebei province. According to his book Yixue Qiyuan (Explanation of Medicine) published in 1186, “the prescriptions of the past were not appropriate for the illnesses of today.” However, Zhang created a unique mosaic of his own practices and beliefs based on the teachings of his predecessors in medical classics such as the Huangdi Neijing (The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine), the Shanghanlun (Treatise on Febrile Diseases) and the Zongzangjing . Zhang Yuansu was known for his idea that medicine has specific effects on particular meridians. He thought illness occurred when there was an imbalance of zang and fu organs. By understanding the pathological conditions of the organs, a diagnosis could be made and appropriate therapy could be chosen.

The Old Gentleman of the Eastern Wall (Li Gao)
Li Gao (1180-1251) had been fascinated by medicine since childhood. Li, who came from a wealthy family, is known for his concern about how lifestyle affects the body’s organs. In his most important work, Piweilun (Treatise on the Spleen and Stomach), he stated that if the spleen and the stomach were injured by an inappropriate lifestyle, vitality would decline and illness would result from an imbalance of qi in these organs. He was a strong believer that a person’s emotions, including anger, joy, sadness and grief, could heavily influence the qi, and that illness was caused by a society marred by poverty, war and oppression. He was a proponent of the use of several tonics and especially recommended ginseng.

Minister of Fire (Zhu Zhenheng)
From Zhejing province, Zhu Zhenheng (1281-1358) was also known as Master Danxi. He undertook a systematic study of medicine and his work, Gezhi Yulun (Theories of In -depth Research), studies the theory of internal fire or heat during physiological and pathological change in the body. Minister-fire is a kind of yang energy that is a vital force necessary for the body to function. It mainly exists in the liver and kidneys. It cooperates with the second fire, “master-fire” or heart-fire, to promote the function of the organs. In illness, Zhu Zhenheng thought that the body’s yang was usually in excess causing yin to become deficient. As a result, “fire” in the body, which is normally produced by movement, was increased during the course of disease and was thought to be due to disharmony of the minister-fire. As a yang excess was thought to be harmful because it consumes yin, nourishing the yin and quenching the fire were the chief measures of treatment. Zhu Zhenheng strongly recommended appropriate diet and sexual activities in order to preserve the yin. This theory of “minister fire” is still used today in TCM.
Acupuncture and Moxibustion

Eating for Health the Chinese Way

Popular Brands of Dog Meat as a Tonic for ‘Vigor’

Important Principles of Food and Drink : Chapter on Virtues of Dogmeat from the Yinshan Zhengyao by 忽思慧 (Hu Zheng Qi Huei circa 1314–1330)

Hu Sihui, a Mongol, is credited for being a distinguished dietician. He wrote Yinshan Zhengyao (Important Principles of Food and Drink) in 1330 and was a proponent of a balanced diet. He especially focused on the importance of moderation and championed the eating in moderation rule. In addition, Hu’s book offered a list of 230 cereals, meat, fish, shellfish, fruits and vegetables with a description of their nutritional benefits. For example, Hu said that eating too many apples caused distension and too many oranges could harm the liver; that dog meat was salty, not too overpowering, non-toxic and calmed the zang organs; and that grapes sustain energy and strengthen character.

点击看大图
Yin Shan Zheng Yao (Principles of Correct Diet)

Hu Si-hui (the biographical information is missing), a great dietitian of the Mongolian nationality of the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368) was an imperial chef for more than 10 years. He widely collected a lot of dietary recipes for health care from cooks, Confucians, Taoists priests, and folks, from which he accumulated experience in health care with diet. In 1330, he presented his book Yin Shan Zheng Yao (Principles of Correct Diet), the first monograph on nutriology to the emperor

Try the below for a glimpse into Bureacrat Level state banquets (feature on ICCR’s proposed Imperial Court Level banquets pending lobby for Constitutional Monarchy might be available in a decade if we are lucky . . . )
http://english.cntv.cn/program/documentary/chinese_state_banquet/index.shtml

Other practitioners during the Jin-Yuan period included Ge Keijiu (1305-52) who wrote a treatise, the Shiyao Shenshu (1348), on tuberculosis and Zeng Shirong whose book Houyou Xinshu (1294) expanded the study of pediatrics from the Song Dynasty.

Articles re-posted and collated from various sources in : http://www.cultural-china.com/

ICCR posted series by : Sub-Editor Murong Esq. (Temp. Sec. for the Regatta)

About : Cultural China

http://www.cultural-china.com is a non-profit cultural website initiated by Shanghai News and Press Bureau and undertaken by Hongtu Real Estate Development Company, one member of the Long River Foreign Exchange Foundation. http://www.cultural-china.com’s vision is to popularize Chinese cultures throughout the world, promote the cultural exchanges between China and other countries, and let the world know more about China through the Internet based on the integration of resources of the Shanghai and national publication industry. http://www.cultural-china.com firmly believes that nowadays people of all countries and areas in the world are in a sense neighbors living in a global village, for whom mutual understanding is vital as well as meaningful for the peaceful coexistence. It is with this belief that we hope to introduce to you this ancient yet young country: its vast territory, beautiful landscape, legendary history, unique and splendid arts, colorful folk traditions, which will help you understand her yesterday and today from various aspects. Cultural-china is dedicated in the promotion and familiarization of the Chinese culture in a global scale. http://www.cultural-china.com serves the Chinese culture’s “Going Global” national strategy while bearing introducing the Chinese culture to the world arena; promote the cultural exchange and communication based on the internet platform; provide information and marketing service related to the Chinese cultural industry as our major objectives. To let the world to know more about the real and modern China and the Chinese culture is our one and only mission.

Cultural-China.com
21 F, 81 South Qinzhou Road,
上海市钦州南路81号出版大楼21楼
Shanghai, 200235,
People’s Republic of China

Telephone/电话:    +86 21 6482 1344
Fax/传真:        +86 21 6482 0873
info@cultural-china.com

Post Navigation