Imperial Chinese Court Regency

Advocacy via Regency for Constitutional Monarchy in China

Archive for the category “Korea”

North Korea News : Autumn 2012 Updates – reposted by T.E. Yu

Youth Day celebrated in North Korea – Edited and Translated by Chen Lidan, Zhu Rui, People’s Daily Online – 07:55, August 30, 2012

North Korea Youth Day

More than 10,000 youth and soldier delegates attended a celebration meeting held in Pyongyang, capital of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), to mark the Youth Day on Aug. 27, 2012, according to the country’s official news agency KCNA.

DPRK’s top leader Kim Jong Un sent a congratulatory message to the meeting, reviewing the history of Korean youth movement.

In the message, Kim said the Youth Day was set and developed by the late leaders Kim Il Sung and by Kim Jong Il and the celebration for this day is a major political event in the country. Kim also demanded that the youth must carry forward the fighting spirit to safeguard the country.

Youth Day of Aug. 28 is an important holiday in DPRK and this is the first Youth Day since Kim Jong Un became the top leader.

Apart from the celebrative meeting in Pyongyang, DPRK’s young people held a series of activities all over the country to mark the Youth Day, including holding performance of “Arirang” show and paying visit to the Martyrs’ Cemetery.

North Korea Youth Day

North Korea’s top leader, wife visit working people’s new flats – (People’s Daily Online) – 08:05, September 06, 2012

People’s Flats

North Korea’s top leader Kim Jong Un and his wife Ri Sol Ju visit working people’s new flats in Changjon Street, according to the country’s official news agency KCNA’s report on Sept. 5, 2012. (Xinhua/KCNA) (Xinhua/KCNA)

North Korea’s top leader Kim Jong Un and his wife Ri Sol Ju visited families of working people who moved to new flats in Changjon Street on Sept. 3.

The first leg of his visit was the family of Sim Tong Su, teacher at Pyongyang University of Mechanical Engineering who lives in flat No. 1 on the second floor from the first entrance of Neighborhood Unit 1 of Jongro-dong in Changjon Street.

The new apartment houses in Changjon Street are the ones to which leader Kim Jong Il paid deep attention from sites to designing and building, he said, adding if he were alive, he would visit them before any others.

After looking round every room, he sat down on the floor of the room unreservedly and had a talk with family members.

Youth Day celebrated in North Korea – (People’s Daily Online) – Edited and Translated by Chen Lidan, Zhu Rui, People’s Daily Online – 08:27, August 30, 2012

Delegates to the celebrations of Youth Day visited various places of Pyongyang on Aug. 27, including Exhibition of Arms and Equipment of the Korean People’s Army, Three-Revolution Exhibition and Fatherland Liberation War Memorial Tower. (Photo/KCNA)

More than 10,000 youth and soldier delegates attended a celebration meeting held in Pyongyang, capital of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), to mark the Youth Day on Aug. 27, 2012, according to the country’s official news agency KCNA.

Unlike the debt-slave/homelessness culture of most Capitalist governments, mid size apartments are distributed to the commoner caste North Korean people FOR FREE, as basic shelter is a Human Right. North Korea is dealing with the agriculture problem which is partly due to inclement weather as much as geological issues as of now.

DPRK’s top leader Kim Jong Un sent a congratulatory message to the meeting, reviewing the history of Korean youth movement.

In the message, Kim said the Youth Day was set and developed by the late leaders Kim Il Sung and by Kim Jong Il and the celebration for this day is a major political event in the country.

Kim also demanded that the youth must carry forward the fighting spirit to safeguard the country.

Youth Day of Aug. 28 is an important holiday in DPRK and this is the first Youth Day since Kim Jong Un became the top leader.

Apart from the celebrative meeting in Pyongyang, DPRK’s young people held a series of activities all over the country to mark the Youth Day, including holding performance of “Arirang” show and paying visit to the Martyrs’ Cemetery.

Kim Jong Il’s sushi chef returns after fleeing for life – by Paula Hancocks, CNN – September 19, 2012 — Updated 1026 GMT (1826 HKT)

Fujimoto has written a number of books about the Kim family since leaving N. Korea
During visit, Fujimoto meets Kim Jong Un and his wife
Fujimoto says Kim gave him a free pass to visit N. Korea whenever he wants

Kenji Fujimoto (pseydonym) with Beloved Leader Kim Jong Un.

(CNN) — Not many people get a personal invitation to visit North Korea’s new leader Kim Jong Un. Kenji Fujimoto was the personal sushi chef of Kim’s father, the late Kim Jong Il, before fleeing to his native Japan in 2001, fearing his life was in danger.

More than a decade later, he returned to North Korea and described a warm reunion with the young Kim. “I jumped up to hug him, shouting ‘Comrade General’ and instantly burst into tears … He hugged me back, the first hug in 11 years. I said, ‘Fujimoto the betrayer is back now,’ and I apologized for all I did and all I disclosed about him. He said, ‘OK, don’t worry anymore.'”

Fujimoto has written a number of books about the Kim family since he left North Korea.

The former chef says he often played with the young Kim before he escaped. During his recent two-week visit, he says Kim thanked him for playing with him and talked about their going horse-riding, jet-skiing; playing tennis, basketball; and rollerblading together. Fujimoto said of the young leader, “I was surprised how gentle a person he is.”

It is not clear why the younger Kim decided to invite Fujimoto back to North Korea, but it is clear that Fujimoto is unwilling to say anything negative about him or the country. Speaking of Pyongyang, he said, “I went window shopping from the third day. There are plenty of goods in shops. That’s already a big difference. There was nothing there 10 years ago … I guess it changed drastically since the Kim Jong Un era started.”

Pyongyang has improved over the past decade, but it is a city for the elite and chosen. In the countryside that few visitors are allowed to see, the situation is very different. Aid groups say food is scarce and malnutrition high.

It may not surprise many that Fujimoto, with his glowing praise, sounds at times like a spokesman for the regime. His wife and children are still living in Pyongyang. Fujimoto claims they want to stay, but there is no way to know for sure. Spending every day with his family, he then stayed the night in a room in the Secretary’s department, claiming he needed to for safety, as there are many who do not forgive him, as he says Kim has done.
I said clearly that if I go back to Japan safely, the reputation of Supreme Commander ‘Comrade General’ would soar enormously
Kenji Fujimoto , former chef to Kim Jong Il

Fujimoto also met Kim’s wife whom the world did not even know about a couple of weeks ago. Of Ri Sol-ju he said, “She is just so charming. I cannot describe her voice, it’s so soft… She said to me, ‘Welcome to the republic. Our comrade the Supreme Commander missed you the most. He was always talking about you. Thank you for coming.’

Kim organized a party in Fujimoto’s honor, according to the chef. He says they talked about old times and did not mention the current situation of North Korea at all. He does admit forgetting how the party ended after he had a few drinks.

“When I regained consciousness, I was on a bed. I asked if I did anything disrespectful. No one said I did, so I felt relieved.”

Fujimoto says Kim gave him a free pass to visit North Korea whenever he wanted, an invitation few have. The benefit of the visit for Kim’s international reputation is not lost on Fujimoto.

“I said clearly that if I go back to Japan safely, the reputation of Supreme Commander ‘Comrade General’ would soar enormously,” he said.

Fujimoto is now willing to tell all who will listen about the virtues of the young North Korean leader.

Murals in North Korea

 

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North Korea – A travel experience – June 12th, 2010 – repost by T.E. Yu (updated on 20th July 2012)

“A country that, takes care of all people, gives work to everybody, where health care doesn’t cost you anything…”

This is what I heard from pro-Fidel Cubans some years ago while traveling to Cuba. Would I hear this kind of comments in North Korea also I wondered? How would it compare to the GDR (Eastern Germany) that I witnessed over 20 years ago? How do people live in North Korea? What are your restrictions traveling through North Korea, etc…

As little information is available about North Korea, I try to summarize all information that I think could be of help for anybody traveling to North Korea or being interested about traveling there. The information gathered here I did get personally from several different people, while I was traveling in North Korea. I won’t will quote persons individually because I don’t want anybody getting in trouble sharing something with me.

North Korea is one of the few nations that can engage in a total war with the United States.

Preparations

Travel type : you can only take part in organized tours. So although it is a really interesting trip it’s not a risky trip at all in my opinion. Stories like here from the german magazine spiegel (translated version), make you believe something else, but in this case the writer seems to be a show-off.

Visa: You need a Visa to get to North Korea. We got it without any complications, it didn’t even have a cost (we got it from the North Korean embassy in Berlin, Germany). From what I’ve heard this shouldn’t have an influence on your future visa applications to the US, but I also heard a different story. What is your experience concerning this, please comment.

Cellphones are not allowed to take to North Korea. So just leave them at home. In case you forget, you have to leave them arriving and will get it back leaving the country. Alle other electronic equipment is allowed, so you can take laptops, iPods, etc. to North Korea, no problem!

Donations: at viventura we advise our clients to what to take along to South America in order to help local people. As officially North Korea doesn’t need any foreign help, in the official travel documents no such information is included. But you do can help. North Koreans love outside clothes (primarily for the better clothes). They prefer 2nd hand western cloths to new clothes available in North Korea. But westerners are not allowed to hand something to North Koreans. So what could you do? a) bring second-hand clothes and leave them in the hotel you are staying b) give clothes to your guides/drivers / leave them in the bus saying, that you have no more use for them… When taking clothes, this clothes shouldn’t be clothes easily identifiable as foreign clothes, so it shouldn’t have any brands or foreign words printed visible on the chest etc… (you are allowed to give the guides/drivers tips at the end of the trip).

The Rugen Shard in the North Korean CBD

The Rugen Shard (alternate view)

Traveling in North Korea

Most tourists in North Korea come from China. Just 2500 “westerners” come here per year. This number will raise this year and especially next year. A big german touroperator (Studiosus) just started to offer tours to North Korea and I expect just them to send 500 tourists to North Korea in 2011.

Personal freedom: you never are allowed to be on your own outside the hotel. Depending on your guide, the guide will accompany you outside the hotel, in rural areas this seems to be easier than in Pyöngyang.

Photography: you can make pictures, as long as no military is being on your photos. Your guides are advised not to let you make pictures of poor houses, hard-working people. They won’t understand, why you would make pictures of this anyway, because it’s not nice, but they also know, that westerners want to photograph exactly this. Always ask your guide, if pictures are allowed, this will prevent your guide getting in trouble. We were told, that stopping the car and getting out is not allowed (we did it twice anyway). Also you’re not allowed to take pictures of things, that are being restaurated.

Eating: Food is really good, but it’s a matter of taste. I personally love Kim Chi. My wife Adriana had a hard time with the food and wouldn’t call it great at all. As I mentioned, that I love Kim chi, I got it every single time 🙂 In our case, the guides could eat twice with us, they would have liked to do it more often, but according to my information, they tourist meals are to expansive to also buy them for guides & drivers.

Shopping: Stores remind me of GDR stores in the eighties. All of the items are displayed in glass vitrines. Products are imported from around the world. We saw brands like “ja” a store-internal brand from Germany, juice from Singapore, chinese junk food, etc…

Local Currency: the local currency is the North Korean Won. Foreigners won’t be able to use them. There is an official exchange rate nevertheless of 140 WON for a EUR. Foreigners are just allowed into international currency stores. Here you can pay with EUR, USD or CNY (Chinese Yuan). You can ask your guide for some currency notes as souvenir.

The most untouched wilderness in North Korea can be found in protected and guided tours.

General Curiosities

When traveling by air to Pyönyang (from Beijing) with North Korean Airline Koryo I set next to a North Korean Person. According to him, he arrived from India, where he worked for 4 years and know ill see his family again after 4 years. He asked a lot of questions about my visit in North Korea. After telling him, that I’ve been to South Korea before, he even asked to see my passport. After arriving in Pyöngyang he chatted with other people on the train, no sign of his wife/kids. I had the impression, that we were investigated on. Also during the flight the stewardess came to us about five times asking us if we were a couple, where we were from, ho many times we have been to North Korea for, etc… After answering she always went back to the first row talking to a man…

Personal at Pyöngyang airport are well equipped. Most of them have a little earphone or communication device in they ear.

All North Koreans have a little red badge with a counterfeit of their “great leader”: Kim Il-Sung. This is similar to China some decades ago, when they had Badges of Mao attached to their clothes. Not everybody was wearing the badge but approximately 95% of the people.

Foreigners: Westerners living in North Korea are not allowed to have contacts with local people. There are about 300 foreigners, most being chinese, but also 15 germans among them. They have their own little district, where North Koreans are not allowed to go in. Some countries have embassies in Pyöngyang (Germany being one of them).

There is lots of speculation about North Korea. For example: do they really have a metro? I wonder why would you question this. Would you think they’d build that many stations on the streets and make the train run just one station, employing thousands of actors just to make some tourists believe Pyöngyang has a metro? Well I don’t think so, Pyöngyang definitely has a Metro.

Cleanness: overall all places we went to were very clean. On the one side there is little plastic being sold in North Korea. On the other hand I could observe lot’s of people sweep the streets.

As North Korea has no right to transmit the World Cup games, that would start in a couple of days (2010 World Cup South Africa), the games will be transmitted one week later. As North Koreans have no other News Source, they won’t no the result before…

When paying for something in a “currencystore” you get the change often in another currency. You buy a drink in EUR and get back some USD…

The restaurants have big common rooms but also private rooms, where you can eat just with your friends or family (same concept as in china)

Political views: Germany is a good country, because we paid we paid the debts caused by wars imposed by Germany to other. The rest of the world: good. China: really good, as they support North Korea. Japan: really bad because of the 40 years, that Japan occupied North Korea. USA: very bad because they prevent a united Korea.

Daily life / General topics

President-Marshal Kim Jong Un with some school children . . .

(here kids prepare for the kids day on the 7th of june 2010)

Agriculture: North Korea is an agricultural country. I’ve never seen a country that used that much terrain for agriculture as North Korea. In our whole trip I couldn’t see any opportunity where they could cultivate more. During the harvesting season also all office workers need to go to the countryside to help getting the crops. This is done on Fridays. Workers participate on the success of the harvesting, as they get a “share” of the harvest depending on the crops success.

Wages: Not all North Koreans earn the same. According to our guides students get a salary of about 50 EUR, normal workers 150 EUR and people in higher positions 250 EUR a month. All North Koreans get a free apartment, health care, education and the rent.

Power/Water Supply: the state has a serous problem generating sufficient electricity and supplying enough water. For most people in Pyöngyang you can just get water 2-3 hours a day (in that time they fill up tanks to save water for the day). The Tourist Hotels in Pyöngyang have all-day water supplies though. Electricity seemed to be working fine in Pyöngyang, as you can see on this picture:

In other areas, in Kaesong for example, we were noticing electricity problems at night. The costs for electricity & water is around 3-5 EUR a month.

Transport: The roads in North Korea are quit empty, nevertheless lot’s of people are driving in cars. It’s forbidden to have a car privately (you can just one a motorcycle or a bicycle privately), but people in good positions get a car for their job. I would guess, that there would be around 20.000 cars or so in Pyöngyang. Apart from cars you have the metro, Taxis, streetcars, buses, bicycles and motorcycles in Pyöngyang.

Businesses: Everything is state owned in North Korea. I know of three Joint-Ventures though.

a) FIAT is cooperating with Pyöngyang to manufacture cars in North Korea, in total the have two brands built in North Korea: Hwiparam & Ppeokkugi

b) a Joint Venture with a German company getting Internet to the hotels
c) a Joint Venture to modernize the cellphone network with an egyptian company, part of the deal is also to finish the 105-floor hotel in the middle of Pyöngyang until 2012

Perhaps as earlier mentioned, Kim Jong Un could transition North Korea into a Constitutional Monarchy and leave the nitty gritty to the workhorses (once the threat of foreign warmongers is over and the 2 Koreas are re-united as a United Kingdom of Korea of course) . . .

Military: The military is really important in North Korea, the military boss is the second most important person in North Korea. On the street you see a constant presence of military. You also have the Youth Organisation, like the Free German youth (from the former GDR)

Corruption: It’s hard to tell to which level corruption exists in North Korea, in my presence two military officers accepted cigarettes in order to do a favor (leaving the hotel, taking a picture)

Situation with South Korea: for me it’s interesting to see that our guides / the local military guide at DMZ never talked about a conflict with South Korea. They always refered to a conflict with the United States. And interestingly, the armistice was negotiated with North Korea on one hand and the US on the other and not South Korea. According to the military person at DMZ, the US tries to stay long-term in South Korea, in order to strengthen their position in demanding long-term presence they blame North Korea for sinking a submarine.

Fashion: for Adriana it was a shock to see that fashion seem to have stuck in the seventies? There is no individualism at all. Even people without a uniform seemed to be dressed a kind. No written words I have seen on any shirt. The clothes remind me of movies made about the GDR.

Smoking: Smoking is ridiculously popular in North Korea. According to our guides 99% of male North Koreans smoke. Even in closed places like in the restaurant. This was totally surprising and sometimes uncomfortable.

Education: It was amazing to see how well our guides spoke english/spanish. They have never been to an english/spanish speaking country, but nevertheless speak fluently. A thing that North Koreans seem to be great in: Singing.

Hanbok wearing locals in North Korea.

Communication

Internet: North Korea doesn’t have Internet yet. A german company is setting up Internet at this time, so that high-ranking military people, important business man and other VIP in North Korea will get it soon. According to my information soon the Hotels for international guests will have Internet Service.

Email: North Korea has a tiny Email infrastructure. For example our guides have email access through the companies email account, there is no such thing as personal email accounts. The email adresses have the domain silibank.com, the domain is registered to LiaoNing ZhongTian Real Estate Develolpment Co.LTD from China. Attachments like PDFs can be read, pictures can’t be sent (it’s unclear if it’s for the size or security).

Cellphones: the cellular network is working for almost 2 years in North Korea. A limited network of people have access to it (and use it a lot), like tourism guides, people who do important business, politicians and military people. Tourists have no right to use cell phones.

News: North Koreans don’t have a free press, all news are emitted from the state. Before arriving to North Korea tensions were high because of the submarine incident with South Korea. North Koreans were aware of these tensions and were informed about the incident. They knew the South Korean/US Version of the story (ship was shot), but believed the North Korean Version of the story (ship ran into a rock). I talked about this incident quit a bit and could into more details if requested in the comments…

I booked my tour with http://www.tschollima-reisen.de and I was really pleased with there service (it’s a german operator).

Exceptional venues.

Source article at – http://www.kiwitz.com/blog/en/north-korea

North Korea and China friendship oriented posters – North East Asia, Far East Orient

Formalise a Principality of Kim, for a United Kingdom of Korea, for Peace and Unity?

Uncontrolled Capitalism Is the Enemy of Mankind, Socialist Limits on Plutocracy is the future . . .

North Korea (perhaps a United Kingdom of Korea?) and China

Perhaps a joint flag off of the next major regatta in North east Asia, or a fishing trip between appropriate officials, to top off the recent successful bout of communications . . .

News : North East Asia – Confucius ritual staged at Sungkyunkwan University in Seoul (Xinhua) – 10:22, May 12, 2012

College students wearing traditional costumes perform traditional ritual at a Confucian shrine in Seoul, South Korea, May 11, 2012. The Confucius ritual is staged twice a year at the Confucian Shrine at Sungkyunkwan University in Seoul, which was built during the Joseon Dynasty in 1398 for Korean Confucian scholars to honor Confucius. (Xinhua/Park Jin-hee)

To remind all those who trod upon Korea in the past that Korea will rise again united and stronger. Korea’s true faith and cultural tradition is Confucianism, and South Korea will not tolerate spiritual colonisation and who knows could learn a thing or 2 from North Korea about internal integrity and continuity.

ICCR proposes a : United Kingdom of Korea (with the appropriate titling of Kim Jong Un via a Constitutional Monarch of South Korea . . . ) designated the Ice Lily Throne, would bring a permanent peace to United Kingdom of Korea.

On 22 August 1910, the Kingdom of Korea was annexed by Japan with the Japan-Korea Annexation Treaty. King Gojong of the Royal House of Joseon was forced to abdicate by the Japanese, and died suddenly on 21 January 1919 at Deoksugung Palace. There is much speculation that he was killed by poison administered by Japanese officials, an idea that gained wide circulation and acceptance at the time of his death. King Gojong’s death and subsequent funeral proved a catalyst for the March First Movement for Korean independence from Japanese rule. 3 generations later 2 King Yi Won (born 23 September 1962) is a descendant of the Joseon Dynasty (a.k.a. Yi Dynasty) and the head of the House of Yi. He worked as a general manager of Hyundai Home Shopping a Hyundai Department Store Group company until Prince Yi Gu died on July 16, 2005. He was born as the eldest son of Prince Gap of Korea, the 9th son of Prince Yi Kang by his wife at Hyehwa-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul and became the adopted son of Prince Yi Gu, the twenty-ninth head of the Imperial house, though the legality of the adoption is contested.

The Yi Family Council chose Prince Yi as the next Head of Korean Imperial Household and they also made his title the Hereditary Prince Imperial (Hwangsason) in the meaning of inherited a title of Prince Gu. His claim is contested by Princess Yi Haewon of Korea who was crowned Empress of South Korea by at least 13 descendants who felt that she should be Empress, not Prince Won.

ICCR note : Suggest that a transferable formal title of upper nobility be bestowed upon the Princess, and that the male hereditary line of Prince Yi be continued.

Should the Confucian culturalists above featured choose to support Constitutional Monarchy to attenuate TRUE KOREAN culture, I suggest that the above burgeoning aristocrats begin a lobby for Constitutional Monarchy to undo the consigning of the Korean people to being a people without a Royal head. Prince Yi who currently lives in an apartment in Wondang, Goyang, Gyeonggi province, Korea with his family, should make application to government of Korea, to allow them access to the former King Gojong’s (1852 to 1919) living quarters (Prince Yi’s great-grandfather) at Gyeongbokgung Palace (Prince Yi’s family home), though no funds should be assigned to the Korean Royal family until parliamentary majority assent to Constitutional Monarchy in Korea is re-affirmed.

ICCR Note : Current leader of North Korea Kim Jong Un could be co-opted into a United Kingdom of Korea, but may be required to relinquish all military and political power in exchange for a hereditary title with appropriate immunities, a state stipend (based in North Korean GDP), and appropriate state respect (i.e. lese majeste laws etc.). The stability in North East Asia achieved with this single act would be the greatest event in the Far East since the surrender of the Japanese after WWII . . . imagine a : “Principality of North Korea under Constitutional Principality – Kim Dynasty – Established, North Korean Military Junta retires into Aristocracy,  Prisoners Released, Two Koreas United”, heading  in the newspapers and online media . . .

A meeting of North Korean apparitchik-junta, South Korean culturist-would-be-courtiers and the South Korean top politicians and South Korean Royal House, specifically for a formalisation of a Principality of North Korea, so that a United Kingdom of Korea is possible?

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