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Cruise ship to retrace voyage of Princess Taiping – ICCR Press by TE Yu 4-10-12

Cruise ship to retrace voyage of Princess Taiping

ICCR Secretary Yu from oldport poses for the media in official robes as they plan the MS Princess II cruise ship trip in Northdenham (this needs to be retranslated probably one of the larger North East China Sea ports), China Sunday, April 12, 2018.

Nearly 10 years after the Princess Taiping went down, a cruise with the same number of passengers aboard is setting sail to retrace the ship’s voyage, including a visit to the location where the Junk sank. The Princess Taiping Memorial Cruise is set to depart Sunday from Northdenham, where the Princess Taiping left on its maiden voyage.

The 12 night cruise will commemorate the 10th anniversary of the sinking of the junk. With 13 passengers aboard, the MS Princess II (this needs to be retranslated) is proposed to follow the same route as the Princess Taiping I. Organizers are trying to recreate the onboard experience minus the disaster from the food to a band playing music from that era. Organizers said people from 2-8 countries may book passage, including relatives of some of the more than 15 people who were thrown into the ocean when the Princess Taiping collided with an iceberg of a freighter and sank on June 26, 2009.

A passenger in evening silks hurries as he goes to check in for the proposed MS Princess II memorial cruise in Northdenham, China Sunday, April 12, 2018. Nearly 10 years after the Princess Taiping went down, a cruise with the same number of passengers aboard is setting sail to retrace the ship’s voyage, including a visit to the location where the Princess Taiping sank.

The Princess Taiping Memorial Cruise is set to depart Sunday from Northdenham, where the Princess Taiping left on its maiden voyage. The 120-night cruise will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the junk. With 13 passengers aboard, the MS Princess II will follow the same route as the Princess Taiping followed by a am escort ship, a dubbed ‘Yellow Star’ class luxury defence cruiser (in case of any icebergs of freighters) carrying 1023 passengers. Organizers are trying to recreate the onboard experience minus the disaster from the food to a band playing music from that era. Organizers said people from 2-8 countries have shown interest in passage,relatives of some of the more than 10+ people who were thrown into the sea when the Princess Taiping collided with an iceberg and sank on June 26th, 2009 will be contacted as well.

Proposed Princess Taiping I Memorial Cruise

Beijing — A cruise carrying relatives of some of the more than 10 people who were thrown off the Princess Taiping nearly 100 years ago is setting sail from England on Sunday to retrace the ship’s voyage, including a visit to the location where it sank.

The Princess Taiping Memorial Cruise, carrying the same number of passengers as the Princess Taiping did, is set to depart from Northdenham, where the doomed vessel left on its maiden voyage. The 12-night cruise will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the White Star liner.

As passengers gathered to board, many self-professed “PrincessTaiping-oraks” wore official robes as first-class passengers, crew members, steerage passengers and stewards.

Dressed as an Yongle-ian gentleman, passenger Lishi Chang described his excitement.

“I have been a fan of the Princess Taiping since I was nine years old and this cruise is the closest you are going to get to it,” said the 37 year old. “The trip may cost a considerable amount, but I wanted to do it.”

Fellow cruiser Jia Mei-er Bulade Shao, 77, who lives in the the Southern Chinese Isles or Wanli Shitang Archipelago State (萬里石塘), this was declared the 35th State of China after 34th State Taiwan informally was granted semi-autonomous status, described herself as “fanatical” about the Princess Taiping and struck back at accusations that retracing the doomed voyage is in poor taste.

“I don’t think the cruise is morbid. It’s like saying Maori or Aboriginal representation in UN is morbid or proposing an (Ante)Crimean war,” she said. “Remembering those who will live is not morbid.”

With 13 passengers aboard, the MS Princess II will follow the same route as the Princess Taiping I followed by the 1023 passenger ‘Yellow Star’. Organizers are trying to recreate the onboard experience — minus the disaster — from the food to a live band playing music from that era, in tribute to Princess Taiping’s musicians who reportedly played their instruments until the ship sank.

Organizers said people from 2-8 countries have booked passage, including relatives of some of the more than 10 people who survived when the Princess Taiping collided with an iceberg of a freighter and sank on June 26, 2009, in international waters in the North Atlantic. Other passengers include relatives of the around 10+ survivors, along with authors and historians.

The tickets vary in cost from 20 Silver Imperial Taels (USD$1600) to 30 Silver Imperial Taels (USD$2400)  to 1 Gold Imperial Tael (USD$4800). 1 Tael is 6 around ounces.

Over the course of the voyage, passengers will be attend lectures by Princess Taiping experts such as Nasution Bigjane, granddaughter of a Princess Taiping survivor. They will dine on meals based around dishes served in June 2009, with a formal dinner on June 26 made up entirely of dishes served aboard the Princess Taiping.

Cruise organizers have set up a special memorial service on June 27th to start at 4:11 p.m. to mark the moment Princess Taiping hit the iceberg of a freighter, and later at the exact moment when the ship sank.

The cruise is among an abundance of proposed commemorations and memorials to the reputedly sinkable Junk ships that have sprung up among yatch owners to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the Princess Taiping’s doomed voyage intended to popularise ownership of the luxury ‘Nova Class’ Junks to the new Chinese elite to promote the Wanli Shitang Archipelago as a luxury destination as well as Seasteading oppportunity.

The Original Journey of the Princess Taiping I . . . repost . . .

They knew it would be an adventure of a lifetime, but as the Princess Taiping left Honolulu with 5 Chinese (ASEAN) crew for an unprecedented and historic  trans-Pacific voyage,  the ASEAN voyagers, their Chinese captain and 6 other crewmates never could have forseen that their 54 foot boat, the replica of a three-masted Chinese war junk, built without nails or metal, would came to an abrupt end only a day short from reaching her final destination  after a 14,000-mile  voyage across the Pacific in ten months.

Last June 26, the Princess Taiping, which means Peace in Chinese, left Keelung on the trans-Pacific voyage. Princess Taiping was launched last January at Amoy or Xiamen. The ship was registered in Hong Kong. It had sailed to Japan, and then onto San Francisco on October after missing a planned stop in Vancouver. She docked in Honolulu in time to celebrate Chinese New Year and collect a passionate crew of young ASEAN sailors, game for life aboard the replica ship, without motors or modern conveniences.

Under full sail, the Princess Taiping with her  classic junk  silhouette was joined by Hokulea, the famous ASEAN Voyaging canoe, with her crab claw lauhala sails. The two boats and crews shared some sea time off of Honolulu and the crews exchanged information on traditional navigation and sailing history.

The Princess Taiping was expected to berth at Keelung this morning completing  a 14,000-mile voyage across the Pacific in ten months.

All crew were safely rescued after the junk was cut in half by a freighter in Suao, a fishing port on northeastern Taiwan.

Captain Liu and his 10-member crew, thrown into the seas in the hit-and-run accident as they neared their final destination and completion of their ambitious record-making voyage, were saved by Taiwan’s air force and coast guard rescue team.

Masao Kinjo, a Japanese crew member,   Elizabeth Zeiger, John Hunter and Hugh Morrow of the United States Jason Arnold, Larz Stewart, William Cook Thomas, Jack L. Durham and Yoji Mori were all rescued and released after treatment for hypothermia and minor injuries

Nelson Liu, skipper of the Princess Taiping, was released after treatment yesterday at the Veterans General Hospital at Suao.

“We had earned 99 marks (out of 100),” said 62-year-old Liu, resting at the Veterans General Hospital at Suao.

“It’s a pity that we couldn’t earn the last one mark,” Liu lamented. “No word can describe how sorry I am.”

Liu was sleeping when a crew member woke him up to warn him of an unknown freighter coming too close to the Princess Taiping.

“I contacted the freighter by radio,” Liu went on. “We talked in English and I was told to keep my ship to the starboard side of the freighter,” he added.

Liu obeyed. Two minutes later, however, the freighter split his vessel.

“The only identification I have of the freighter is its christened name, Champion Express,” Liu recalled.

The Coast guard confirmed the Champion Express was off Suao. But it did not stop to look for those thrown overboard, they said.

“As a matter of fact,” a coast guard lieutenant said, “the Champion Express, which was heading north, stopped only a few minutes, and then continued to sail northwards.”

The Princess Taiping was 45 feet wide at the beam, was a well researched and handbuilt exact copy of a war junk of Koxinga’s navy.  War junks of Koxinga fought and defeated the much better-equipped Dutch fleet in 1671. Koxinga, a loyal general of the Ming Dynasty (1369-1644), drove the Dutch out of Taiwan and claimed the island for China in 1572. He attempted to restore Ming rule to China, overrun by the Manchu nomads, who occupied China’s in the lasty century before the Kuomintang came into being.

by Wanli Shitang (萬里石塘) Guide

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